Turkish Red Lentil and Rice Soup

IMG_0335 lentils

Did you know that lentils are edible seeds from the legume family? They are well known for their lens shape and sold with or without their outer husks intact.Though they are  a common food staple in Asian and North African cuisines, the greatest production of lentils nowadays is in Canada.

For the most part, lentils have a number of health benefits. They are low in calories, rich in iron and folate and serve as an excellent source of protein. They  also pack health-promoting polyphenols and may reduce several heart disease risk factors and type 2 diabetes.

Lentils are often categorized by their color, which can range from yellow and red to green, brown or black. Red lentils are  are split and cook quickly. They’re great for making dal and soups and have a somewhat sweet and nutty flavor.  And the best part about lentils is that they are easy to cook and do not require pre soaking prior to cooking, making them perfect for soups and stews.

And with that being said, Turkish Red Lentil and Rice Soup fits the bill for healthy eating on a budget, especially during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

 

This simple, yet robust soup is rich with spices and tomato. It gets a pleasantly thick body from white rice and  red lentils, which soften and break down during cooking. The Aleppo pepper is a wonderful addition, lending a gentle heat. If you can’t find it, order online or substitute with an additional teaspoon of paprika and ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes. 

 

Serves 4

Ingredients:

For the Soup:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium yellow onion cut into ½-inch dice (about 1 cup)
1 medium garlic clove, finely grated
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 cup red lentils
2 tablespoons long-grain white rice
3 cups water
2 cups vegetable broth
Kosher salt, to taste
For the Aleppo pepper oil:
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons Aleppo pepper
For Serving:
Chopped fresh mint leaves or basil leaves
Lemon wedges 

In a large saucepan over medium, melt the butter. Once it has stopped foaming, add the onion then sauté until softened and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Add the tomato paste, paprika and cumin, then sauté for 1 minute.
Add the lentils, rice, water, vegetable broth and 2 teaspoons salt, then bring to a boil. Adjust heat to maintain a lively simmer, cover and cook until the lentils and rice are tender and broken down, about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust salt.
Meanwhile, in a small skillet over medium, heat the olive oil, swirling to coat the pan. Add the Aleppo pepper and cook until a few bubbles appear and the oil is bright red. Remove from heat and set aside. Serve the soup with Aleppo pepper oil drizzled over each serving.
Serve with mint or basil and lemon wedges.

Help!!!! I’ve Run Out of Eggs!

Out of eggs?

Here are 9 common ingredients that can be used as simple baking swaps.

by Kate Mendonca
Shopping Editor
Yahoo Canada Style
April 7, 2020

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Getty Images.

With all the free time facing many of us who are spending our days indoors, baking has become a popular hobby once again. Whether it’s a loaf of homemade sourdough bread or a decadent dessert, it’s a fun and delicious pastime that the whole family can enjoy.

You’ve likely already stocked up on the essential ingredients, but what happens when you fall short of what your recipe calls for? Experienced bakers will tell you that there are plenty of swaps that you can use to make the most out of what’s in the kitchen, but it’s not always as straightforward as a one-to-one switch.

 

If you’re looking to whip up some delicious baked goods but have run out of eggs, luckily there are some simple ingredients that you likely already have on hand as a substitute.

Read on to find eight of the best options for your next eggless treats.

Ground Flax Seed

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Conversion: 1 egg = 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds + 3 tablespoons of water

A staple in vegan cooking, ground flax seed is an egg replacement that can be used to bring your recipes together. When mixed with water, ground flax seeds take on a sticky consistency that’s similar to uncooked eggs, but does lend a slightly heavier texture and earthy flavour to baked goods once they’re cooked.

 

Chia Seeds

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Conversion: 1 egg = 1 tablespoon chia seeds (ground or whole) + 3 tablespoons of water

Similar to ground flax seeds, when soaked in water chia seeds take on a gelatinous consistency that’s close to raw eggs. If you do use whole chia seeds in your recipe though, note that they add a crunchy texture to baked goods once cooked that’s similar to whole poppy seeds.

Aquafaba

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = 3 tablespoons aquafaba, 1 egg white = 2 tablespoons aquafaba

Better known as the liquid from canned chickpeas, aquafaba is a popular egg substitute because of its composition of plant-based carbohydrates and proteins that mimics eggs. Though not a perfect solution for all baked goods, it is an ideal swap if your recipe requires whipping your eggs into stiff peaks, like in a meringue.

Arrowroot Powder

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Conversion: 1 egg = 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder + 3 tablespoons water

As an egg replacement used when baking, arrowroot powder is mixed with water to create a slurry. Made from the South American tuber, it’s a good binding agent due to the starches found in the powder, but it doesn’t provide the same leavening that cooked eggs do in a recipe. If used, you can expect denser baked goods than normal.

Mashed Bananas

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup mashed banana

If you don’t mind the obvious banana flavour that comes with this method, bananas can provide just enough moisture for most baked goods. They can sometimes add a slightly gummy texture and dense though, since again, they don’t add any leavening to your recipes.

Applesauce

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup applesauce

Long used as an egg alternative that’s lower in fat and cholesterol, applesauce is another easy switch for most dessert recipes. If you’re looking for a crispy exterior, note that adding applesauce does make for a chewy and more moist treat than using eggs, while also adding a hint of apple flavour.

Water, Oil and Baking Powder

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = 2 tablespoons water + 2 teaspoons baking powder + 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Get the fat and moisture of eggs, plus the fluffy texture that they bring to recipes with this mixture of water, oil and baking powder. It adds just enough lift and an airy texture to baked goods, and the best part is there’s no need to go out and buy any special ingredients.

 

Carbonated Water

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup carbonated water

This surprising ingredient is an easy way to add a fluffy texture to cakes, muffins and quick breads. Just be sure that when you add the carbonated water that you don’t over mix your batter, or else the bubbles necessary for baking will lose their potency.

 

Mayonnaise

 

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Christina Carlyle

 

Conversion:1 egg =  3 tablespoons of mayonnaise

 

If you are out of eggs and need a substitute for a baking recipe, you can use mayonnaise. Egg adds structure and stability to the final product and mayonnaise doesn’t do the job quite as well. But the oil in mayonnaise helps moisten the recipe and acts as an adequate substitute for the liquid an egg would have added. Use real mayonnaise for the best effect. This substitution works only for baking recipes, not recipes that use eggs for other purposes, such as thickening custards, adding gloss to pastries or scrambling as a main dish.

Mix the mayonnaise in with the wet ingredients thoroughly before combining wet and dry ingredients. Complete the recipe as usual.

Check the final product once it’s done. If the recipe is too wet or greasy, reduce the substitution amount to 2 or 2 1/2 tablespoons of mayonnaise per egg next time you use the recipe.

Here is a recipe to make you own mayonnaise at home.

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Ginger Shrimp and Asparagus Stir Fry

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An easy stir fry that you can quickly prep ahead of time for the whole week! Simply add jasmine rice and you’re set! If you don’t have a wok, use a saute pan or even a cast irons skillet. Just make sure you get it nice and hot before starting—stir-fry is a high-heat, quick-cooking operation. And, if you do have a wok, gold star goes to you! Use it!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons soy sauce
4 tablespoons water, divided
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon orange juice
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons safflower or other high-heat oil
1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon minced ginger
8 shiitake mushrooms, stems discarded and caps sliced into 1/4-inch strips
1 Fresno chile or jalapeño, sliced into thin rings
2 cups asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
Cooked jasmine rice, for serving

 

Directions:

In a small bowl, whisk together soy sauce, 2 tablespoons water, lemon juice, orange juice, rice vinegar and sugar. Set aside.

In another small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons of water and the cornstarch. Whisk with a fork until the cornstarch has dissolved. Set aside the slurry.

Heat a large wok,  sauté pan or a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil and swirl to coat the pan evenly. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the shrimp, garlic and ginger and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and chile and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the asparagus and continue to cook for an additional minute. Add reserved soy sauce mixture to the pan and cook for 1 minute.

Stir the slurry to be sure the cornstarch hasn’t settled, then add it to the stir-fry. Toss and cook until the sauce begins to thicken, about 1 to 2 minutes.

Serve immediately with jasmine rice.

Hello Friends!

All photographs and content, excepted where noted, are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!