In the Time of COVID-19, How Much Holiday Food Do I Need?

How much food do I need?

With just under two weeks away, whether your Thanksgiving looks a little smaller this year whether you are a singleton, a couple or if you have a hungry family to feed. Well, this quick cheat sheet for Holiday Servings will help you figure out how much turkey, sides, pie and most importantly, wine that will you need for the holidays.

Most grocery chains are currently taking order for Turkey Day Dinners  with all the trimmings, serving up to 6 people and are available for curbside pick up, locally. Call your local supermarket for availability.

Gourmet on-line shops also offer holiday dinners. Click on the link to check out their offerings. If this seems like an option, order right now!
Harry& David

Williams Sonoma

MagicKitchen.Com Turkey Dinner for 2

 

If you are planning to cook your own dinner, start shopping now. Be sure to start cooking on Monday or Tuesday the week of the holiday to avoid stress in the kitchen.

And if all else fails, you may be able to order take out and have it delivered.

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# of people                  1                     4                           8
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Turkey*                        1 1/4 lbs       5–6 lbs               10–12 lbs
Salad                            2 cups           2 quarts               4 quarts
Stuffing/Dressing    3/4 cup         3 cups                  6 cups
Potatoes/Starch**   3/4 cup         3 cups                  6 cups
Veggie side                1 cup              1 quart                2 quarts
Bread/Rolls               1 piece           1 dozen              2 dozen
9″ pie                           1 slice             1 pie                    2 pies
Bottle of wine***     1/2                   2                           2–3
_______________________________________________________
* Includes bone weight. For 1–2 servings, consider buying a roast             turkey  breast.

** If buying potatoes to make mashed potatoes, buy 1/2 pound of             potatoes per guest.

*** A standard bottle of wine is 750ml.


Grilled Salmon Steaks and Cucumber Salad

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Salmon steaks, cut crosswise through the backbone, instead of fillets makes got the prefect grilled fish. The steaks are thicker, making them easier to flip while grilling. A yogurt-based cucumber salad packed with fresh herbs acts both as a sauce and a side dish for salmon in this low-carb seafood dinner.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 seedless English cucumber,thinly sliced
1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more for seasoning
4 salmon steaks
5 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
2 teaspoon white wine vinegar
1 1/4 cup loosely packed fresh dill, finely chopped
1/2 cup loosely packed fresh mint, finely chopped

Directions:
Set grill or grill pan to medium-high. In a large bowl, season the cucumber and red onion with the salt, tossing to combine. Let stand at least 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, with paper towels, blot the salmon until dry. Brush on both sides with 2 tablespoons of oil. Season with salt and pepper. Place salmon on grill and cook 5 minutes per side, until cooked through. Meanwhile, drain cucumber and onion well.

In the same large bowl, whisk together the Greek yogurt, vinegar, dill, mint, and remaining 3 tablespoons of oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Fold in drained cucumber and onion. Serve with salmon.

Grilling Notes:
To prevent sticking, be sure your grill is very clean and very hot before placing the salmon on it. When flipping, if the salmon does not lift from the grate easily, wait 15–30 seconds, then try again.

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A Tale of Two Asparagus Dishes

Asparagus….one of my favorite vegetables to eat, especially for Easter Dinner.

Today, I present two dishes from two different eras: Marinated Asparagus (18th Century)  and   Sauteed Asparagus with Gribiche Sauce (20th Century).

 

Marinated Asparagus

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Asparagus became widely available in America during Colonial times, and was a particular favorite of Thomas Jefferson. This dish is prepared by a common French technique that dates back to the Roman Era. Jefferson enjoyed this recipe for asparagus while he was Minister to France. Given how much asparagus grew in his gardens at Monticello, this dish was more than likely prepared by his enslaved French-trained chef, James Hemings and later served at Monticello and at the White House.

Sauteed Asparagus with Gribiche Sauce

 

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Gribiche Sauce is basically Egg salad’s sophisticated cousin. This sauce dates back to the early 20th century when the “mother sauces” were established by French chefs Marie Antoine-Carême and Auguste Escoffier. Although gribiche is not considered a foundational sauce in the French culinary sphere, it originates as a variant of the egg-based “mother sauce,” hollandaise. It has been adapted and modified by chefs and writers, but the true essence of gribiche remains: finely chopped hard-boiled eggs mixed with mustard, herbs, and capers for an added bit of tanginess. The hard-boiled eggs are key: this is the defining difference between gribiche and mayonnaise, which is made with raw eggs.

The nature of a sauce is that it rarely ever tastes the same, and this rings especially true for gribiche where the components to create your personal version of it are almost always on hand. Cornichon pickles, shallots, and red wine vinegar are among the many ingredients that can be added to the recipe. It can be served as an accompaniment alongside an appetizer of cured meats, as a flavorful addition draped over roasted fish and vegetables, or simply as a dipping sauce for a fresh baguette. It’s safe to say gribiche’s ease, versatility, and flavor have won the hearts of culinary enthusiasts around the world.

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All photographs and content, excepted where noted, are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

 

Thank you so much!