Dry Aged Steaks with Bleu Cheese & Crispy Shallots

Grilled Ribeye Steaks with Bleu Cheese Sauce & Crispy Shallots Recipe | D'Artagnan
These dry aged steaks with creamy bleu cheese sauce and crunchy fried shallot rings makes for a hearty meal.  For an extra touch, you can serve the steaks along side of you your favorite potato dish and a crisp green salad.
Recipe Adapted from

D’ARTAGNAN.com

2019

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 shallots, thinly sliced into rings
¾ cup whole milk
¾ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup cornstarch
Oil, for frying
Coarse salt, to taste
2 cups crumbled blue cheese
¾ cup heavy cream
Freshly cracked black pepper, to taste 
4  Dry aged steaks, about 20 oz. each

Directions:

Add shallots to a small bowl, cover with milk and allow to soak for about 30 minutes. In another small dish, mix together flour and cornstarch. Working in batches, using a fork, dredge the shallot rings in the flour mixture, coating evenly. Put battered rings aside on a plate. In a shallow skillet, heat oil to 350 º F.

Again working in batches, fry battered shallots until golden brown and crisp. Drain on paper towels. Season with coarse salt and set aside.

In a small bowl, fold together blue cheese crumbles and cream. Season with pepper. Refrigerate until needed.

Heat grill to medium-high or heat coals in a charcoal grill until they glow bright orange and ash over.  Lightly oil hot grates.

Let steaks stand at room temperature for about 20 minutes. Season both sides of each steak with coarse salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

Grill steaks for about 6 minutes on the first side, rotating 90 degrees at the halfway mark to create cross-hatch grill marks, if desired. Using tongs, flip each steak to the other side and grill for another 6 minutes, or until desired doneness. We suggest medium-rare, which would register 125 º F on an instant-read thermometer.

Let steaks rest for 8 -10 minutes before serving, each with a generous spoon of blue cheese sauce. Top with crispy shallots.

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Crêpes à la Sauce Camembert

crepes2.jpg

A crêpe or crepe  is a type of very thin pancake. Crêpes are usually of two types: crêpes sucrées  or sweet crepes, which are made with white flour and eaten for dessert;  and crêpes salées also known as    savoury galettes,  that are made with buckwheat flour and filled with savory fixings.

In terms of culinary etymology, crêpes belong to the general category of ancient Greek Tiganitai, from Greek tiganos (τίγανος), meaning “frying pan”, which in English is literally translated to Pancakes. The French term, crêpe, derives from the Latin crispa, meaning with “creases”. The name “galette” came from the French word galet (“pebble”) since the first gallettes were made on a large pebble heated in a fire.

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While crêpes are often associated with Brittany, a region in the northwest  of France, they are also enjoyed throughout France, Belgium, Canada, and many parts  of Europe, North Africa, Lebanon, and Argentina.

Preparing crêpes at home is also common, and very easy.  As a home cook, you have the ultimate freedom to use whatever fillings you like. In this way, crêpes salées become a wrapper for all types of leftovers. It should be noted that the addition of an egg almost always improves a savory crêpe.

This is an Americanized recipe where the crepe batter needs to be refrigerated for at least 30 minutes before cooking the crepes. As the batter chills, the flour expands and absorbs the liquid, which helps produce tender crepes. You can cook the crepes in advance and fill them just before serving.
Recipe Adapted from
Williams-Sonoma
2019

Serves 6

Ingredients:

3 eggs
2 cups milk
3/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon canola oil
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
3  tablespoons olive oil
3/4  pound white button mushrooms, sliced
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
3/4 pound thick-cut baked ham, chopped
1 cup heavy cream
4 ounces Camembert cheese, rind removed, diced
4 green onions, white and light green portions, chopped
1/2 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped

Directions:

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs and 1 cup of the milk. Add the 3/4 cup flour and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and whisk until the batter is smooth. Stir in the canola oil. Refrigerate the batter for at least 30 minutes or as long as overnight before making the crepes.

In a crepe pan over medium heat, melt 1/4 Tbs. of the butter. Pour about 1/4 cup batter into the pan, then quickly tilt and turn the pan in a circular motion to spread the batter evenly to the edges. Cook until the crepe is golden underneath, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a spatula, flip the crepe and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more. Transfer to a warm plate. Repeat to make 12 crepes.

In a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, warm 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add half of the mushrooms, 1/2 teaspoon the salt and pepper and sauté until the mushrooms are dark brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Push the mushrooms to the side of the pan, add the remaining mushrooms, and sauté until the liquid evaporates and the mushrooms are dark brown, 6 to 7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the mushrooms to a bowl. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the ham to the pan and sauté until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Transfer the ham to the bowl with the mushrooms.

Reduce the heat to medium-low, add the remaining 1 cup milk and whisk in the 3 tablespoons of flour. Simmer until the sauce thickens, about 2 minutes. Add the cream and cheese and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens, about 3 minutes. Add the ham, mushrooms, green onions and parsley and stir until heated through. Spoon 1/4 cup of the filling in the middle of each crepe and roll the crepe around the filling.

Cook’s Notes:

When making crêpes, you make your batter ahead of time. The night before is ideal, but at least two hours in advance is required.If you are making the crêpesbatter the night before, refrigerate it, and then let it come to room temperature before cooking. You want to give it time to relax into itself, and for the flour to absorb the liquid evenly. If the batter looks a little dry after this resting period, it’s ok to add a bit more liquid.

Another great thing: crepes freeze incredibly well. My suggestion is to make the entire batch at once, even if you will have extra. Simply layer what you won’t eat between parchment paper, move to a sealed plastic bag, and voila! Now you have crêpes for the next time too.

Sources:

Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae, XIV, 645c; Galen, On the Properties of Foods, I, 3.

Cristina Sciarra (2012). “All About Crêpes“.The Roaming Kitchen.
Accessed October 19, 2019.

Williams-Sonoma (2019) Crepes a la Camembert.  Accessed September 10, 2019

 

 

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Thai Soy-Garlic Fried Lamb Chops with Sweet Ginger Chili Pepper Sauce

lamb chops

These Thai inspired fried lamb chops are so easy! Just a few ingredients and a few minutes and you have hot, juicy ribs with a soy-garlic-rubbed Thai twist.

Serves 2 to 4

Ingredients:
Two to three lamb chop racks (12 to 14 ribs), separated into individual chops
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
7 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
2 quarts vegetable oil, for deep frying
Sweet Ginger Chili Pepper Sauce (recipe below), for serving

Directions:
Put the lamb in a large no reactive bowl. Add the soy sauce, garlic, and black pepper to coat. Let stand at room temperature.

Heat the oil in a large heavy pot over medium-high heat to 370°F. Working in batches of 4 or 5, fry the ribs until just cooked and well browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Bring the oil back to 370°F between batches. Using a spyder, remove any stray bits of garlic from the oil to prevent burning, making the oil taste like burnt garlic.

Serve the fried lamb chop family style on a platter with Ginger Chili Pepper Sauce on the side.

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