Guinness Beef and Mushroom Pot Pie

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Delmonico Steaks

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First run in 1867, it is the oldest of the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing, making it the longest continuously run race in North America, predating the Kent9428330.jpgucky Derby by eight years and the Preakness by six years. The Belmont Stakes is held every June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York, just outside of New York City. The race, nicknamed The Test of the Champion and The Run for the Carnations, is the third and final leg of the Triple Crown and is held five weeks after the Kentucky Derby and three weeks after the Preakness Stakes, on a Saturday between June 5 and June 11.

And like most spectator sports, horse racing, at the Belmont Stakes and the Triple Crown are all about traditions, food and drinks. The Kentucky Derby is famous for it’s Mint Julep and Hot Browns Bibb Salads, while the Preakness Stakes is known for its Maryland Crab Cakes and Black Eyed Susans.

There are so many iconic food associated with New York City. And what comes to mind for me is a nice juicy steak, like the ones served at the legendary Delmonico’s Restaurant. Delmonico’s opened in Manhattan’s financial district in 1837 and it broke new ground in the American dining industry. It was the first establishment to go by the French term, “restaurant,” and the firsts did not end there.

del.jpegDelmonico’s was ahead of its time, allowing female patrons to dine without the accompaniment of a male escort. It was the first restaurant to have a printed menu, offer a separate wine list, use tablecloths and also the first to have diners sit at private tables.

With that being said, no other dish, but the Delmonico Steak would be the prefect meal serve to your guest on race day, with the accompaniment of side dishes like Dauphinoise Potatoes and Creamed Spinach or Green Beans .

Serves 6

Ingredients:
Six 20-ounce boneless prime rib-eye steaks, at room temperature
Sea salt, to taste
Coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

For the Herb Butter:
3 fresh bay leaves
1 Tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
2 tablespoons sea salt
1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

Directions:
For the Herb Butter:
Combine the bay leaves, thyme, and salt in a spice grinder and process until powdery.

Place the butter in a mixing bowl. Add the powdered mixture and, using a hand-held electric mixer, blend well.

Scrape the butter mixture onto the center of a sheet of plastic film. Pull the film up and over the soft butter and, using your hands, form the butter into a roll about 1 3/4 inches in diameter. Wrap tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week, or wrap in freezer wrap, label, date, and freeze for up to 3 months.When ready to serve, unwrap the herb flavored butter and, using a sharp knife, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, allowing one slice per steak.

For the Steaks:
Clean, oil, and preheat the grill.Wipe excess moisture from the exterior of the steaks using a paper towel. Season one side with salt and pepper.

Place the steaks on the hot grill, seasoned side down. Grill for 3 minutes. Season the top side and, using tongs, turn the steaks and grill for 3 minutes to just sear the exterior.

Remove the steaks from the grill and, using a pastry brush, lightly coat both sides of each steak with olive oil.

Return the steaks to the grill and cook, turning occasionally, until the exterior is nicely charred and the interior has reached the desired degree of doneness on an instant-read thermometer.

Remove from the grill and let rest for 5 minutes before serving with a generous pat of Herb Butter.

Cook’s Notes:
Alternatively, you can also cook the steaks by pan searing.Sprinkle each steak with the pepper and salt; then rub each steak with a small amount of olive oil.

Pre-heat a cast-iron skillet over high heat; then place each steak in the skillet. Uncovered, sear on one side of the steak for 5 minutes then turn the steak over and sear the other side for 3 minutes.Reduce the heat and cook for an additional 8 to 10 minutes or until the internal temperature is 145 º F for medium doneness.

Serve each steak topped with slice of the chilled herb butter.
– – IMPORTANT FOOD SAFETY REMINDER – –
It is recommend to use an instant-read thermometer to check the doneness. Rare steak will have an internal temperature of 120 º to 125 ºF; medium-rare to medium should read 130 º to 150 º F. This should take somewhere near twenty minutes, depending upon the thickness of the meat and the heat. Above 150 º F, a steak is considered well-done, which is not a desirable temperature for a really good steak! A steak should sit for five minutes or so before cutting, so remember that it will continue to cook as it sits when you gauge the internal temperature.

Cooking temperatures and times and may vary for your oven, broiler stove top or grill.

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor


Pork Tonkatsu with Ponzu Cherry Compote

 

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Tonkatsu is one of the most beloved “western style” Japanese foods in Japan. A pork cutlet is dredged in flour, egg, panko and then fried. “Ton” is Japanese for pork, and “katsu” is derived from the word for cutlet. The best thing about tonkatsu is that it’s super easy to make.

The highlight of this dish is the ponzu flavored cherry compote. Ponzu (ポン酢?) is a citrus-based sauce commonly used in Japanese cuisine. It is tart, with a thin, watery consistency and a dark brown color. Ponzushōyu or ponzu jōyu (ポン酢醤油) is ponzu sauce with soy sauce (shōyu) added, and the mixed product is widely referred to as simply ponzu.The element pon arrived in the Japanese language from the English word punchSu () is Japanese for vinegar, and hence the name literally means vinegar punch.

To make the dish even more Asian in flavor, mizuna would have been used in the salad.
Mizuna (ミズナ(水菜)which loosely translated into English as  “water greens” is also known as , shui cai, kyona, Japanese mustard, potherb mustard, Japanese greens, California peppergrass, or spider mustard is a cultivatedvariety of Brassica rapa nipposinica. The name is also used for Brassica juncea var. japonica. The taste of mizuna has been described as a “piquant, mild peppery flavor…slightly spicy, but less so than arugula. A vigorous grower producing numerous stalks bearing dark green, deeply cut and fringed leaves. They have a fresh, crisp taste and can be used on their own or cooked with meat. I Japanese cuisine, you will find them pickled. Highly resistant to cold and grown extensively during the winter months in Japan.

This dish is easy to make and takes less than thirty minutes to complete, from start to finish. The finish plate for each serving is a pork cutlet topped laying on a bed of dressed arugula and  with a cherry compote and a sprinkling of lemon zest.

 

Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 cup fresh  dark cherries*
2 cloves garlic
1  package of fresh argula
4 pork cutlets
2 Tablespoons ponzu sauce
3 Tablespoons honey
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
Kosher salt, to taste
Ground Black pepper, to taste
1 Teaspoons mustard powder
1 cup  Japanese panko bread crumbs
1 egg
Zest of 1 lemon

Directions:
Wash produce. Roughly chop cherries, discarding pits. Peel and mince garlic. Place the pork between to sheets of plastic wrap; using a meat mallet, rolling pin or small heavy pan, pound to about an  ½ inch thickness. Remove pork from the plastic and  pat dry with a paper towel.

Prepare Ingredients:

 

To make the cherry ponzu compote: In a small bowl, combine the honey and ponzu sauce. Add  the cherries and stir to combine. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Set aside.

 

To bread the pork: In a large shallow bowl, combine flour, salt, and pepper. In a second large shallow bowl, whisk together the egg with mustard powder. In a third large shallow bowl, add panko bread crumbs. Season pork on both sides with salt and pepper. Add to flour, turn to coat, then shake off excess. Add to egg, turn to coat, then allow excess to drip off. Add to panko bread crumbs, pressing to adhere.

Bread Pork:

 

 

 

To cook the tonkatsu: Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a large pan over medium heat. When oil is shimmering, add pork and cook until browned on outside, 3-4 minutes per side. Remove from pan and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain.

Cook Pork Tonkatsu:

 

While pork cooks, in a large bowl, combine  garlic, and 1 teaspoon vegetable oil. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Add the arugula and toss to coat.

 

To serve, divide the  pork tonkatsu and salad evenly between plates. Spoon the ponzu cherry compote over pork; garnish with the lemon zest  and serve.

Enjoy!

Cook’s Notes:
If fresh cherries are not available, frozen dark cherries can be used in this recipe. Just be sure to thaw and drain any excess water before using.

Canned cherries can also be used, just omit the honey, if the cherries are packed in a heavy syrup or glaze

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor