Category Archives: Seasonal

Hello, May!

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What’s in season right now, this month? For starters, lettuces, turnip greens, kale, and possibly some root vegetables like fennel and onions are signatures of Spring. You’re also likely to see strawberries, rhubarb, and asparagus, and okra. Check out the list below for a quick guide to the top in-season fruits and vegetables for the month of May.

May Fruits and Vegetables

Artichokes
Apricots
Arugula
Asparagus
Basil
Beets
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Collard Greens
Cauliflower
Chard
Cherries
Garlic
Green Garlic
Garlic Scapes
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Okra
Peas
Radishes
Rhubarb
Scallions
Spinach
Strawberries
Sugar Peas
Snap Peas
Swiss Chard
Turnips
Turnip Greens
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Hello, March

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Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables for March

Listed below is a broad range of beautiful fruits and  vegetables that are available right now, as well as tips on how to prepare them.

Arugula
Asparagus
Avocados
Beets
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Chives
Collards
Endive
Garlic
Grapefruit
Guavas
Kumquats
Leeks
Lemons
Limes
Mandarins
Mint
Onions
Oranges
Parsley
Parsnips
Potatoes
Radishes
Rhubarb
Rutabaga
Strawberries
Tangerines
Turnips
Spinach
Walnuts

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Asparagus is a perennial favorite and is really only worth eating in the springtime. And since asparagus season comes around for a few short weeks every spring try to enjoy this delicious vegetable while it lasts! The fresh flavor of asparagus purchased at the farmers market is at its best when prepared simply.  It can be eaten raw, grilled, roasted and sauteed. Think beyond drenching it i Hollandaise sauce. It’s lovely with lemon and mint. Shaved asparagus is great in salads and roasted asparagus makes a perfect springtime side dish, whether it is at a barbecue or a formal dinner.

Photo Credit: SouthwestJournal.com, 2017

 

 

CITRUS FRUITS
Citrus fruits like grapefruits, lemons, limes oranges, tangerines and mandarins show up citrusevery year when the sky goes gray and we are all in desperate need of some bright color on our plates during our winter meals and continues to grace our dinner tables right through spring.  Now is the best time where you can find a great selection of citrus fruits in you local  grocery stores and super markets right now. Why not use real lemon juice to make your favorite salad dressing, it tastes so fresh and the light acidity will make a salad sing!

 

 

PARSNIPS
Parsnips are root vegetables that look like off-white carrots with parsley-like, leafy tops.Parsnips-58371ca43df78c6f6a3688e9 Unsurprisingly, they’re related to both carrots and parsley. Parsnips are usually served roasted or cooked, but can also be eaten raw.

Look for bright, very firm, relatively smooth parsnips. They should, like most fruits and vegetables, feel heavy for their size. This tip is particularly important when choosing parsnips, since they can get dried out or turn extra woody if not properly stored.If you’re lucky enough to buy parsnips with their greens still attached, the greens should look fresh and moist. Remove the greens when you get them home for longer storage.

Store the parsnips chilled and loosely wrapped in plastic. Fresh parsnips will last a week or two properly stored.

When cooked until tender parsnips have a lovely, starchy texture that works beautifully roasted or added to soups and stews. Add parsnips the same way you would add carrots or potatoes to stews, knowing that they’ll have a nuttier flavor than carrots and a sweeter, more distinctive, and less starchy flavor than potatoes.

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Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Vegetable Medley

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Photo Credit: Cooktop Cove, 2016

I absolutely L-O-V-E Brussels sprouts!

Most people do not and the lovely little vegetable has a bad reputation for being the least tasty among pick eaters. But I have found that when you find the right way to cook them they are actually incredibly delicious!

Traditionally Brussels sprouts have been boiled, since time in memorial and crispy-balsamic-brussels-sprouts-2this method of cooking diminishes their flavor, making them soggy and without texture. So I roast mine instead and this method of cooking totally elevates the lowly sprout to new heights. Yes! Roasting them gives the sprouts a delicious crispy texture and an awesome flavor. They are a very savory vegetable though, which is why in this recipe they were paired with red apples to give them with a little sweetness and baby Yukon Gold potatoes so that you have a wonderful range of flavors with each fork full.

This recipe is just in time for during the winter doldrums!

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients:
1 pound Brussels sprouts, cut in half
1 pound baby Yukon Gold potatoes, cut in half*
2 Red Delicious apples, medium diced
1 shallot, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons ginger, minced into a paste
7 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, small diced
1½ teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
1½ teaspoons salt
Ground black pepper, to taste
Drizzle of olive oil
2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley, for garnish
1/2 cup cashews, roasted and roughly chopped, for garnish (optional)

 

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400º F.

In a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together except, parsley and cashews.

Line a baking dish with parchment paper. Spread the Brussels sprouts mixture on top. Drizzle with olive oil.

Bake for 25 to 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the Brussels sprouts are browned in spots and the other vegetables are tender and crispy around the edges.

Remove the Brussels sprouts from oven and transfer to a serving platter. Garnish the vegetables with a sprinkling of parsley and cashews, if desired and serve immediately.

 

Cook’s Notes:
*You can use any full sized potatoes that you desire, just cut them into a medium sized diced.

 

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Thank you so much!

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Hello, February!

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Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables for February

 

Listed below is a broad range of beautiful vegetables that are available right now, as well as tips on how to prepare them. Hopefully you’ll be inspired to skip the peas and corn in the frozen section of the grocery store and pick up one of these seasonal vegetables instead.

Arugula
Asparagus
Beets
Bok choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Carrots
Celery
Cilantro
Clementines
Dill
Endive
Fennel
Grapefruit
Kale
Lemons
Lettuce
Leeks
Oranges
Onions
Parsnips
Pears
Radicchio
Shallots
Sweet Potatoes
Swiss Chard
Tangelos
Tangerines
Turnips
Rhubarb

BRUSSELS SPROUTS
Brussels sprouts are the small, nutty members of the cabbage family. They are wonderful roasted, shaved, or on their own as a filling, flavorful side dish.crispy-balsamic-brussels-sprouts-2.jpg

 

CABBAGE
Iredgrncabbagex-56a495175f9b58b7d0d7ae20.jpgf you are eating on a budget, cabbage might be the best bargain out there and it still is extremely easy to come by in the middle of winter. It also tastes just as great as it did in October, making it a prime candidate for winter eating.

 

 

WINTER GREENS
Kale, Collards, Radicchio, Endive, and Chard are some of the greens that shine during the winter months. Take advantage of their amazingly unique flavors and textures by enjoying them raw or cooked.

 

BEETS
beets.jpgNot every one will jump up and down with excitement in eating beets. From a healthy viewpoint, beet roots contain valuable nutrients that may help lower your blood pressure, fight cancer and inflammation, boost your stamina, and support detoxification. Try adding beet roots raw to salads or as part of your vegetable juice; beet greens can be sautéed with spinach or Swiss chard. I hope that beets are making their way into your kitchen more frequently.

Chicken Cacciatore

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This version of the hunter style chicken will surely satisfy you soul on a cold winter’s day! Instead of the traditional bell peppers, carrots, fennel and celery were added to give this dish a another taste and also a twist of lemon at the end of cooking, makes it special too. For a heartier fare, serve this main course dish over polenta, pasta or mashed potatoes.

Serves 6

Ingredients:
8 Chicken Drumsticks*
8 Chicken Thighs*
Kosher salt, to taste
Ground black pepper, to taste
1/4 cup olive oil
1 bunch celery, sliced, leaves reserved
2 carrots, sliced*
1 medium fennel bulb, sliced*
1 medium yellow onion, sliced
2 Tablespoons roasted garlic
1 Tablespoon tomato paste
1 cup dry white wine (or water)
One 28-oz can crushed tomatoes
1 bunch fresh flat leaf parsley
1 bunch fresh thyme
4 cups chicken stock
Juice of 1 lemon

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400 º F.

Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat a Dutch oven over medium high heat and add the olive oil, heating until the oil is shimmering. Add the chicken and cook, turning once until well browned on both side, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer chicken to a clean plate. Add celery, carrots, fennel, onion and garlic to the Dutch oven. Cook vegetables over high heat until the caramelize, stirring to prevent sticking. Add tomato paste and sauce and saute the mixture for about 5 minutes. Add the wine and using a wooden spoons, scrape the fond (brown bits) from the bottom of the pot.

Add the tomatoes, thyme, parsley and stock to the pot. Bring the liquid to a simmer. Return the chicken to the pot, cover and place it in the oven, in the center of the rack.

Bake until the chicken is tender as it falls away from the bones, 45 to 60 minutes.

To serve, remove the thyme and parsley and discard. Toss the celery leaves with the lemon juice. Divide the stew evenly among warmed wide shallow bowls and top with celery leaves. Serve immediately.

Cook’s Notes:
*Some substitutions can be made with this dish to suit your needs and what may be in the pantry or on hand in your kitchen.

Six to seven chicken quarters can be used instead of separated legs and thighs, which would be more economical and budget friendly.

Instead of fennel, 1 teaspoon of fennel seeds serves as a great replacement.

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Thank you so much!

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Hello, January

Hello, January

The colder month are when a rainbow of fruits and vegetables reach their peak, from dark kale to sunny lemons.

Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables for January

Beets
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Carrots
Cauliflower
Grapefruit
Jicama
Kale
Leeks
Lemons
Oranges
Parsnips
Pears
Pomegranates
Potatoes
Red Cabbage
Sweet potatoes
Tangelos
Tangerines
Turnips
Winter squash

Hello October……

 

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Fresh produce is usually of better quality and taste when in season bringing a greater variety to your diet.

Autumn vegetables such as beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and pumpkins are  delicious roasted and in wonderfully warming soups.

Beet chips by Minimalist Baker

Beets are tremendously earthy and can be eaten fresh, cooked or roasted. Some (like the golden variety) are pretty sweet. Noteworthy beets recipes:

 
Fruits like apples and  grapes, are perfect for snacking this time of year and make the most delicious desserts. During this time of year, the biggest, juiciest, most delicious apples are harvested during this time of the year. Crisp, chopped apples in salads with blue cheese and apple slices dipped into peanut or almond butter can be a great alternatives to be added to the lunch box for your kids as well.

Grapes are pretty perfect all on their own, or as a welcome, light option on cheese plates. I recently discovered the magic that is roasted grapes. Roasted grapes are sweet, jammy and delicious on goat cheese or brie crostini. Best of the Grape Recipes:

grapes

 

 

Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables for October

Apples
Beets
Blackberries
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Butter lettuce
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Chicory
Collard greens
Dates
Eggplant
Figs
Grapes
Kale
Melon
Peaches
Pears
Peppers
Persimmons
Plums
Pomegranates
Potatoes
Pumpkins
Raspberries
Sweet potatoes
Tangerines
Tomatillos
Tomatoes
Watermelon
Winter squash

 

Hello September……

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Summer is  winding down as many teachers and their students have already returned to school.  This month’s produce guide marks  a scattering of seasonal produce that may be challenge for  home packed school lunches. But by the same token football season is also here and there are a number of healthy options that you can serve for finger foods and appetizers without expanding the waistline.

Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables for September:

Apples
Artichokes
Blackberries
Blueberries
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Carrots
Chile Peppers
Cucumber
Curly Kale
Figs
French Beans
Garlic
Horseradish
Leeks
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Nectarines
New Potatoes
Peaches
Pears
Plums
Pumpkins
Red Onions
Spinach
Squash
Sweet Corn
Tomatoes

 

So this month, we will be featuring a number of fruits and vegetables that would be suitable for lunch boxes, tailgate parties  and vegan dinner options that will delight even the most fineky of eaters.

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Strawberry Vanilla Jam

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Photo Credit:  www.Napidoktor.hu,  2015.

Making your own jam is a great way to use your slow cooker in the summer. It’s also a delicious way to use up overripe fruit.

Makes About Four 8-pints

Ingredients:
2 pounds of strawberries
1 vanilla bean
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 cups sugar

Directions:
Wash the strawberries and drain in a colander. Remove the stems from the strawberries and cut in half. With a small, sharp knife, halve the vanilla bean lengthwise. Add strawberries and vanilla halves to a slow cooker along with the lemon juice and sugar. Stir well, cover, and cook on low for 2 hours.

Uncover the slow cooker and stir the jam. Continue cooking, uncovered, on low for an additional 2–3 hours or until the jam has thickened, stirring occasionally. Don’t worry if it is a little runny; it will get thicker as it cools. If you want a smoother consistency, use a potato masher to break up the fruit.

Discard the vanilla bean and ladle the jam into four  1-cup plastic or glass containers with tight-fitting lids. Allow to cool, uncovered, then cover and refrigerate or freeze until needed. Jam will last 3 weeks in the refrigerator and up to 1 year in the freezer.

Cook’s Notes:
Try swirling a spoonful of jam with plain Greek yogurt for breakfast or dessert.

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Thank you so much!

 

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Salmon Ravigote

 

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Poach delicious salmon steaks or fillets in only 15 minutes!

Salmon fillets are poached briefly, then served with a ravigote sauce. Ravigote means “to invigorate” in French, and this sauce, containing tomatoes, scallions, garlic, parsley, lemon juice, and olive oil, awakens the taste buds and complements the salmon. Pickled capers lend wonderful piquancy to the sauce.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
For the Sauce:
2 plum tomatoes  halved, seeded, and diced
1 tablespoon drained capers
2–3 scallions, trimmed  and sliced
1/3 cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/3 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon lemon zest
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

For the Salmon:
Four 5 ounce skinless salmon fillets, about 1 1/2 inches thick
3 cups of water
Kosher salt, to taste

Directions:
To make the sauce, mix all the ingredients together in a small bowl. Set aside.

To poach the salmons, bring 3 cups of salted water to a boil in a large stainless steel saucepan. Add the salmon to the pan and bring the water back to a boil over high heat for 2 minutes. Immediately turn off the heat, or slide the pan off the heat and let the salmon steep in the hot liquid for 5 minutes. Note that your fillets will be slightly underdone in the center at this point and you may have to adjust the cooking time to accommodate thicker or thinner fillets, depending on your personal taste preference.

Remove the fillets from the poaching liquid with a large spatula, drain them well, and place on four warm plates. Absorb any liquid that collects around the fillets with paper towels, then spoon the sauce over and around the steaks and serve.

Cook’s Notes:
Alternatively,  for the poaching liquid, you can substitute 1½ cup dry white wine, like a good Sauvignon Blanc added to  1½ cups of water, for a different flavor profile.

All photographs and content are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

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