Help!!!! I’ve Run Out of Eggs!

Out of eggs?

Here are 9 common ingredients that can be used as simple baking swaps.

by Kate Mendonca
Shopping Editor
Yahoo Canada Style
April 7, 2020

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Getty Images.

With all the free time facing many of us who are spending our days indoors, baking has become a popular hobby once again. Whether it’s a loaf of homemade sourdough bread or a decadent dessert, it’s a fun and delicious pastime that the whole family can enjoy.

You’ve likely already stocked up on the essential ingredients, but what happens when you fall short of what your recipe calls for? Experienced bakers will tell you that there are plenty of swaps that you can use to make the most out of what’s in the kitchen, but it’s not always as straightforward as a one-to-one switch.

 

If you’re looking to whip up some delicious baked goods but have run out of eggs, luckily there are some simple ingredients that you likely already have on hand as a substitute.

Read on to find eight of the best options for your next eggless treats.

Ground Flax Seed

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Conversion: 1 egg = 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds + 3 tablespoons of water

A staple in vegan cooking, ground flax seed is an egg replacement that can be used to bring your recipes together. When mixed with water, ground flax seeds take on a sticky consistency that’s similar to uncooked eggs, but does lend a slightly heavier texture and earthy flavour to baked goods once they’re cooked.

 

Chia Seeds

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Conversion: 1 egg = 1 tablespoon chia seeds (ground or whole) + 3 tablespoons of water

Similar to ground flax seeds, when soaked in water chia seeds take on a gelatinous consistency that’s close to raw eggs. If you do use whole chia seeds in your recipe though, note that they add a crunchy texture to baked goods once cooked that’s similar to whole poppy seeds.

Aquafaba

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = 3 tablespoons aquafaba, 1 egg white = 2 tablespoons aquafaba

Better known as the liquid from canned chickpeas, aquafaba is a popular egg substitute because of its composition of plant-based carbohydrates and proteins that mimics eggs. Though not a perfect solution for all baked goods, it is an ideal swap if your recipe requires whipping your eggs into stiff peaks, like in a meringue.

Arrowroot Powder

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder + 3 tablespoons water

As an egg replacement used when baking, arrowroot powder is mixed with water to create a slurry. Made from the South American tuber, it’s a good binding agent due to the starches found in the powder, but it doesn’t provide the same leavening that cooked eggs do in a recipe. If used, you can expect denser baked goods than normal.

Mashed Bananas

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup mashed banana

If you don’t mind the obvious banana flavour that comes with this method, bananas can provide just enough moisture for most baked goods. They can sometimes add a slightly gummy texture and dense though, since again, they don’t add any leavening to your recipes.

Applesauce

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup applesauce

Long used as an egg alternative that’s lower in fat and cholesterol, applesauce is another easy switch for most dessert recipes. If you’re looking for a crispy exterior, note that adding applesauce does make for a chewy and more moist treat than using eggs, while also adding a hint of apple flavour.

Water, Oil and Baking Powder

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Conversion: 1 egg = 2 tablespoons water + 2 teaspoons baking powder + 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Get the fat and moisture of eggs, plus the fluffy texture that they bring to recipes with this mixture of water, oil and baking powder. It adds just enough lift and an airy texture to baked goods, and the best part is there’s no need to go out and buy any special ingredients.

 

Carbonated Water

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Getty Images.

Conversion: 1 egg = ¼ cup carbonated water

This surprising ingredient is an easy way to add a fluffy texture to cakes, muffins and quick breads. Just be sure that when you add the carbonated water that you don’t over mix your batter, or else the bubbles necessary for baking will lose their potency.

 

Mayonnaise

 

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Christina Carlyle

 

Conversion:1 egg =  3 tablespoons of mayonnaise

 

If you are out of eggs and need a substitute for a baking recipe, you can use mayonnaise. Egg adds structure and stability to the final product and mayonnaise doesn’t do the job quite as well. But the oil in mayonnaise helps moisten the recipe and acts as an adequate substitute for the liquid an egg would have added. Use real mayonnaise for the best effect. This substitution works only for baking recipes, not recipes that use eggs for other purposes, such as thickening custards, adding gloss to pastries or scrambling as a main dish.

Mix the mayonnaise in with the wet ingredients thoroughly before combining wet and dry ingredients. Complete the recipe as usual.

Check the final product once it’s done. If the recipe is too wet or greasy, reduce the substitution amount to 2 or 2 1/2 tablespoons of mayonnaise per egg next time you use the recipe.

Here is a recipe to make you own mayonnaise at home.

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Heart-Shaped Red Velvet and Cheesecake Puff Pastries

hearts puffed

Photo Credit: The Classic Catering People, 2017.

For me, cooking and baking is a true expression of love. And with Valentine’s Day right around the corner I can’t think of a better way to express love by treating the special people in my life with this delightful scrumptious dessert.

Adapted from
The Classic Catering People
January 31, 2017

Makes 2 Pastries

Ingredients:
For the Red Velvet Filling:
1 cup graham cracker crumbs
4  commercially prepared red velvet cupcakes, without icing
1 sheet puff pastry
1 egg yolk

For the Cheesecake Filling:
1 1/2 8-ounce packages cream cheese
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoon vanilla extract
6 ounces sour cream

Confectioners sugar, optional

Special Equipment:
Heart-shaped cookie cutters
Pastry bag with plain tip (#3 or #4 tip)

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 365 º F.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

In a large bowl using a hand mixer, beat the cream cheese and sugar together until smooth. Add eggs and vanilla; mix until smooth. Add sour cream; mix until combined.
Fill a pastry bag with the cream cheese filling and set aside.

Using a heart-shaped cookie cutter, cut 4 heart pieces out of the   puff pastry, to have a top and bottom for each heart.Layer half of graham cracker crumbs in a heart shape on top of the puff pastry, keeping it away from the edges.

Pipe a layer of cheesecake in a zigzag pattern on top of the graham cracker crumbs.

Crumble the red velvet cupcakes and sprinkle some on top of the cheesecake layer, covering the cheesecake as much as possible.

Pipe another layer of cheesecake filling on top of the red velvet cake, making sure to stay away from edges.

Place a puff pastry heart on top of the layers; line it up to meet the edges of the bottom heart. Using the same cookie cutter push down to cut the edges off the heart and seal the pastry together.

Brush the pastries with the egg yolk wash. Place the pastries on the prepared cookie sheet and place in the oven and bake until golden brown, turning over once.

Remove from the oven. Dust with a little confectioners sugar and serve with coffee, if desired.

 

Cook’s Notes:

If you prefer to bake a red velvet cake from scratch, please click here for the link to a great recipes. 

If you are using frozen commercially prepared puff pastry sheets, be sure to thaw them according to the directions on the package.

Substitutes for pastry bags
Plastic Sandwich Bag:Plastic sandwich bags are a popular substitute for pastry bags. They are useful because they are disposable, most homes have them and they are easy to handle. You can use zip-top bags, slider-tip bags or simple sandwich bags that have a fold-over top. Simply put the frosting in the bag and push it to one corner. Twist the top of the bag shut and place one hand at the back of the frosting. Snip the tip of the corner with a pair of scissors and begin piping. Begin with a small cut and gradually adjust if you want your pipes bigger. You can also snip the corner and place a metal pastry piper into the bag before you put the frosting in so that you can make designs.

Paper:You can use parchment, greaseproof or waxed paper to make a pastry bag. Simply cut the paper into a square. Then, fold it into a triangle by bringing one corner to the opposite corner. Roll the triangle into a cone so that the point will be where the frosting comes out. Tape the cone together. Add a metal piping tool and then the frosting. Fold the top of the bag down and begin piping. Paper is a popular substitute for pastry bags because most kitchens will have some variety of glossy paper.