Tag Archives: Chicken thighs

Braised Chicken with Tuscan Kale and Andouille Sausage

chicken and kale.jpgA traditional Italian dish of braised chicken nestled in a bed of earthy kale and sweet red peppers makes a perfect combination with the spiciness of Louisiana Creole andouille sausage, giving you a one-skillet meal packed with lots of flavor!

Serves 6

Ingredients:

For the Chicken:
6 chicken thighs on the bone with skin, about 2 pounds total
1/4 teaspoon salt
Freshly black ground pepper, to taste
3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for the bread
1 large sweet onion, quartered, thinly sliced
1 large red bell pepper, cored, seeded, diced
7 ounces fully cooked andouille sausage, sliced
3 cloves garlic, crushed
6 cups (10 ounces) roughly chopped Tuscan kale*
½ cup dry white wine or chicken broth

For the Crostini:
6 thick slices French or Italian bread
3 tablespoons crumbled feta
Fresh chopped parsley leaves, for garnish

Directions:
Season chicken generously on all sides with salt and pepper. Heat oil in large (14-inch) nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken, skin side down, in single, uncrowded layer. (Use two pans if necessary.) Cook until nicely browned and skin is crisped, about 12 minutes. (Turn on the exhaust fan and use a splatter guard to keep mess to a minimum.) Flip chicken; brown the other side, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a plate skin side up so it stays crispy.

Spoon off and discard all but 2 tablespoons of the fat in the skillet. Add onion and red pepper. Cook, stir occasionally, over medium heat until onion is nicely golden, about 8 minutes. Add sliced sausage and garlic; cook, 1 minute. Stir in kale. Cook, stirring, until wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in wine to mix well. Nestle the chicken, crispy skin side up, into the kale mixture leaving the skin uncovered. Cook, uncovered, on low until chicken juices run clear, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat broiler. Brush bread slices on both sides with olive oil. Broil bread, 4 inches from heat source until golden, about 1 minute. Flip; top with a little feta cheese. Broil the second side until golden, about 30 seconds.

Sprinkle chicken with parsley leaves. Serve chicken with the bread for mopping up all the pan juices.

*Cook’s Note:
Polish sausage can be substituted for the andouille for a milder dish. Cleaned and cut Tuscan kale, also known as black or lacinato kale, is sold in 10-ounce bags at some grocers. If Tuscan kale is not available in your local area, you can substitute 2 small bunches (about 1 pound total) kale, then trim off tough stems before cutting into 2-inch pieces.

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Chicken Noodle Soup with Herbs and Petite Green Peas

Chicken soup with egg noodles and petite peas
Photo Credit: Sun Basket, 2017

Sesame Chicken and Green Beans

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This dish is version of the classic Chinese dish Mala jiding where crispy chunks of deep-fried battered chicken in a sweet, sour, and savory glaze packed with sesame flavor.

Sesame chicken , also called Chinese Sesame Seed chicken ,is a syncretic dish, commonly found in Chinese restaurants throughout the English-speaking world. Traditionally made with green bell peppers. It is sometimes, but not always, served with vegetables such as broccoli and Chinese baby corn.The dish is also similar to General Tso’s Chicken and Orange Chicken, but the taste of the Chinese-based sesame chicken is sweet and savory flavor rather than a hot and spicy, like General Tso’s Chicken and Orange Chicken.

Whatever the case may be, this Chinese take-out classic can be made in your own kitchen and can be enjoyed by all.

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs

For the Marinade/Batter:
1 egg white
6 Tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
2 Tablespoons Shaoxing wine, or sherry vinegar, or dry sherry
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
4 Tablespoons cornstarch
4 Tablespoons water
1 teaspoon baking powder

For the Sauce:
3 Tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon ginger, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon chile sauce, or Sambal Oelek, or Sirracha
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 Tablespoons Shaoxing wine, or sherry vinegar,or dry sherry
1/2 cup sugar
2 Tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
Peanut oil, for deep-frying
Salt, to taste
3 Tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, for garnish
2 to 3 Tablespoons finely chopped scallions, for garnish

Cooked green beans, for serving

Directions:
Wash the chicken under cold running water, pat dry and trim off any excess fat. Cut the chicken into 1-inch cubes and put into a large mixing bowl. Add the marinade ingredients to the bowl and stir to combine. Set aside to marinate while you prepare the sauce.

To make the sauce: In a saucepan, add the sesame oil and set over low heat. Add the ginger and garlic and fry gently until fragrant, about 2 to 3 minutes. Meanwhile, combine the remaining sauce ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir well to dissolve the cornstarch.

Gently pour into the saucepan with the fried ginger and garlic. Stir as you pour because the cornstarch will thicken up pretty quickly. Keep warm over low heat.

In a heavy-bottomed pot or deep-fryer heat enough oil to come halfway up the sides of the pot, to 375 ºF. Fry the chicken, in small batches, until golden and crispy, about 5 to 6 minutes. Remove the chicken using a wire mesh strainer and drain on paper towels. Season with a little salt, to taste.

To serve, arrange the fried chicken on a platter and pour drizzle with the sauce. Sprinkle with a generous amount of toasted sesame seeds and serve over the green beans.

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Purple Sweet Potato Drunken Noodles

 

17342561_1289407111108437_4882623554027756896_n.jpgAll photographs and content are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

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Persian Fried Chicken

 

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This is an absolutely wonderful dish that is very easy to prepare and requires some advance planning. A yogurt marinade helps tenderize the boneless, skinless chicken thighs, infusing them with saffron and paprika, and a quick frying lends the meat a crispy, minty coating. The chicken must marinate for several hours, or overnight for the best results,  before it can be cooked and the marinade contains that costliest of spices, saffron but the wait and splurge are worth it.

Enjoy!

Serves 8

Ingredients:

½ teaspoon saffron or turmeric*
2 cups plain whole-milk yogurt
1 Tablespoon chopped garlic
2 ½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
2 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 Tablespoon dried mint
1 Tablespoon salt, more for sprinkling
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Vegetable oil, for frying
1 cup walnut clusters, for garnish
1 lemon, cut into wedges

Directions:

In a small bowl, combine saffron with 1 tablespoon water and let soak 10 minutes. Place in food processor with yogurt and garlic and purée until smooth and  pale yellow. Place chicken in ziploc plastic bag; pour yogurt mixture on top, seal the plastic bag and turn to coat; place the ziploc bag in a bowl and and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight, for the best results.

In a medium bowl, combine flour, paprika, garlic powder, mint, salt and pepper. Dredge the chicken pieces in flour mixture, dip the chicken in the yogurt batter once again and dredge in the flour a second time. Place the chicken on a wire rack and allow the breaded chicken to sit for  about 1o to 15 minutes before frying.

Heat a generous half-inch oil in a  deep cast iron skillet over medium heat. Drop in a bit of bread to test temperature; oil should bubble vigorously. Working in batches to avoid crowding, fry the chicken until it is golden brown on both sides, about 7 minutes per side. Remove and drain on paper towels.

Sprinkle with salt and top with walnuts and lemon wedges. Serve with basmati or jasmine rice, family style.

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*Cook’s Notes: 

Saffron, long among the world’s most costly spices by weight, is native to Greece or Southwest Asia and was first cultivated in Greece.saffron_thread.jpg
Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the “saffron crocus”. Saffron crocus grows to 20–30 cm (8–12 in) and bears up to four flowers, each with three vivid crimson stigmas, which are the distal end of a carpel. The styles and stigmas, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and coloring agent in food.
In terms of flavor, no substitute for saffron exists. It is completely unique.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger fturmeric.jpgamily, Zingiberaceae. It is native to southwest India.

When not used fresh, the rhizomes are boiled for about 30–45 minutes then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep-orange-yellow powder commonly used as a spice in Bangladeshi cuisine, Indian cuisine, Pakistani cuisine and curries, for dyeing, and to impart color to mustard condiments. One active ingredient is curcumin, which has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell.

Turmeric has a very strong, distinctive flavor, and could easily overpower or clash with other flavors in a recipe not written for it. You might be very unhappy with the results in a dish that’s supposed to have the subtlety of saffron. However, it would certainly work in certain dishes, albeit with an entirely different flavor profile.

If the primary interest is coloring, there is the suggestion of annatto, as it imparts a beautiful color with essentially no flavor.

Personally, rather than try to a substitute for the saffron, I would continue to use it in those recipes that call for it, especially if it’s key in the flavor profile. For example, saffron pilaf just won’t work without it.  If your  budget is  tight, just make those dishes less frequently and savor them all the more, when you use saffron.

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor

Lobster Stuffed Chicken Cushions

 

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The culinary history of chicken cushions have yet to be thoroughly researched, but it is believed that are French  in origin.

The closest cousin of this culinary creation may have been “Paupiettes of Veal” which were made from thin slices of veal approximately 5 in (12 cm) long by 2 inches (5 cm) wide cut from either the cushion or under cushion. After having lightly flattened and trimmed the slices, cover them with a layer of forcemeat in keeping with their preparation, roll up into the shape of a cork, wrap in a thin layer of salt pork fat and tie them round with thread so that they keep their shape while cooking.

330px-Auguste_Escoffier_01The description of the veal  recipe was written by Georges Auguste Escoffier (1846 – 1935)  a French chef,restaurateur and culinary writer who popularized and updated traditional French cooking methods. He is a legendary figure among chefs and gourmets, and was one of the most important leaders in the development of modern French cuisine. Le Guide culinaire was Escoffier’s attempt to codify and streamline the French restauran225px-Guide_culinaire_fr_2001.jpgt food of the day.The first edition was printed in 1903 in French.  The second edition, an abridged English translation was published in 1907 as A Guide to Modern Cookery. By  1912, the third  edition and the current fourth edition were published in 1921, respectively. This usage of the book still holds today; many culinary schools still use it as their culinary textbook.

In any event, I discovered these chicken cushions while on holiday in London and was complete taken by them. My first experience with a chicken cushion was chicken breast, stuffed with a bread filling and neatly wrapped in a slice of bacon. It was amazing.chicken-cushions

With this recipe, I experimented a bit using a lobster stuffing which had spectacular results. It is the perfect dish that you can use to impress your friends and family at your next dinner party.

 

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients:

1 steamed lobster (1 1/2 pounds)
4 Tablespoons unsalted butter
6 scallions, finely chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1  1/2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup heavy cream
A Pinch of cayenne pepper
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 ounces fresh breadcrumbs
1 egg yolk
8 boneless chicken  leg and thigh quarters, with skin
8 slices bacon
Olive oil

Special Equipment:
Meat mallet
Kitchen twine

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 375°F.  Position rack in center.

Remove all the meat from the lobster and roughly chop. Set aside.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add scallions and saute for 2 to 3 minutes. Add lobster meat and wine, stir quickly to combine over high heat. Drain mixture, reserving the liquid. Set lobster and scallion mixture aside. Melt remaining better in another skillet. Add flour and cook slowly to make blonde roux, without deep brown coloring or for about 5 minutes. Add reserved liquid to the cream. Cook, constantly stirring until mixture begins to thicken. Stir lobster meat back into the roux, add cayenne and season with salt and pepper to taste. Allow the mixture to cool completely. Add the breadcrumbs and egg yolk;  mix with a wooden spoon. Cover  with plastic wrap and place the lobster filling in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.

Rinse chicken quarters and pat dry. Put the de-boned chicken  quarters on a large chopping board with the skin downwards. Trim any fat from around the edges. Place the quarters, 1 at a time, between two sheets of waxed paper and gently pound with a meat mallet until about 3/8-inch thick. Remove wax paper and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Remove the lobster filling from the refrigerator.

Spoon the filling in the  center of the chicken. Fold the chicken so that the stuffing is enclosed. Take a slice of bacon and wrap around the circumference of the bundle. Tie with string, like the spokes of a wheel, adjusting the string and patting the chicken into shape to form a round cushion.

Lightly oil a 13 x 9-inch baking pan. Place the cushions skin side up in the baking pan. Brush with the oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cover with foil and roast in a preheated oven,  at 375°F  for 20 to 35 minutes. Remove the foil for the last 30 minutes and baste the chicken once or twice with pan juices until a deep golden brown and cooked when tested.

Allow the cushions to cool, remove the string and cut into wedges and serve with your favorite side dishes.

 

Cook’s Notes:

To learn how to de-bone a  whole chicken  see this video at the following link at The Scott Rea Project

To learn how to de-bone a chicken quarter, see the video at the following link: Good To Know

Braised Chicken Thighs in a White Wine Broth with Shiitake Mushrooms

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This dish is a variation of Chicken Marsala and is a one-pan chicken dish with mushrooms, all cooked in a pan with wine and chicken broth. This dish is so easy to prepare, and is so delicious, as well as budget friendly.


Serves 3 to 4

Ingredients:
1 1/2 lbs skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
Kosher salt , to taste
Ground black pepper,  to taste
1 Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
3 Tablespoons unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
5 Sprigs fresh thyme
1 pound Shiitake mushrooms, roughly chopped
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup chicken broth
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

Season chicken with salt and pepper on both sides.

In a large cast iron skillet, heat oil and 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat. Working in batches, cook the chicken thighs on both sides until the skins become brown and crispy.Transfer to a plate and set aside.

Reduce heat to medium, add garlic, thyme, mushrooms, and remaining 2 tablespoons butter, cook until softened.Add wine, broth, and return chicken to pan along with any accumulated juices. Season with salt, pepper, and cook,until the broth is reduced by half.

To serve, ladle broth and mushrooms into a pasta bowl.Top the broth with one chicken thigh and top the dish off with chopped parsley and serve immediately.