Tag Archives: Chives

Seared Scallops with Bacon in Garlic Lemon Butter Chardonnay Sauce

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Serves 4

Ingredients:
5 strips bacon
1 pound scallops
Kosher salt, to taste
Ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
3 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed
2 tablespoons Chardonnay or any type of white wine
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened but not melted
Fresh parsley, chopped, for garnish
Fresh chives, snipped, for garnish

Directions:
Heat a large cast iron skillet to medium high. add the bacon and cook until golden brown. Remove the bacon and drain on paper towels. All is to cook before crumbling into bits. Set aside.

Pat dry scallops with paper towels. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper. set aside.

Pour of the bacon fat and wipe the skillet clean with paper towels. Heat the skillet to medium high. Add of olive oil and heat until the oil is shimmering. Add the garlic. Add the scallop and sear on high heat, about 3 minutes on each side. Remove the scallops from the skillet and drain on paper towels.

To the skillet, add the lemon juice and the Chardonnay (or other white wine) Scrape the bottom of the skillet to release the fond.

Remove the skillet briefly from the heat and add the butter to the lemon Chardonnay sauce, and stir, to create a creamy sauce. Add the crumbled bacon bits and scallops back to the skillet.

To serve, ladle a small amount of the lemon sauce onto a plate add 2 to 3 scallops to the plate and garnish with chopped parsley and snipped chives.

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Baked Avocado Eggs

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What’s even better than avocado toast? Baked Avocado Eggs! We used chopped chives, but please feel free to serve this baked egg dish with whatever fresh herbs, like cilantro and any other toppings that you may have available on hand. For those of you that like a hint of spice, a tablespoon of salsa or a little hot sauce would do just nicely!

Serves 4

Ingredients:
2 ripe Haas avocados
1/2 a lemon
4 eggs
Salt, to taste
Ground black pepper, to taste
1/2 cup shredded Monterrey Jack cheese, or a cheese of your choice
4 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled
1 tablespoon chopped chives

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 °F.

Slice avocados in half and remove the pits. Using a large spoon, scoop out some of the avocado to make the center hole bigger.

Place avocados in a muffin baking tin, facing up.

Squeeze over the juice of the lemon over the tops of the avocado halves. This will stop them turning brown in the oven. Now crack your eggs into each of the avocado halves. Lightly season with salt and pepper, and top with a sprinkling of shredded cheese and bacon.

Bake for 15 minutes, or until the egg is cooked to your liking. Once they are done, let them stand for 1 minute before serving them.

Garnish with chives, serve and enjoy!

Cook’s Notes:
One of the many great things about avocados is the fact that they are really good for you. Being a healthy fat, they are high in omega 3 fatty acids which means they are perfect as a breakfast meal– packed full of protein, fiber, vitamin C, A and B-6.

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Stove-top Pork Ribs

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Today, we are presenting our Stove top braised pork ribs in a soy sauce and balsamic vinegar reduction…..

Need we say more?

As you know, ribs are one of the most popular foods in the entire world, yet most people still have difficulty making them at home. Here is a foolproof braising technique that does not require any special equipment, just one pot and your stove top!

By cooking your ribs in a cooking liquid  we can guarantee that you will have a moist, tender and extremely flavorful rib. Perfectly salted with soy sauce and totally herbaceous, with taste of fresh lime to add zip to every bite. You do not have to grill your ribs over hot coals or smother them in barbecue sauce, for an authentic foodie experience and this recipe proves it just fine!

 

Adapted From
by Michael Bednarz
shared.com
May 11, 2017

Serves 4

Ingredients:
10 pork spareribs
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
10 cloves garlic, crushed
2-3 tablespoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons granulated onion powder
1 tablespoon dried rosemary
3-4 sprigs fresh oregano
3-4 sprigs fresh thyme
2 bay leaves
1 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 chicken bullion cube
Kosher salt, to taste*
ground black pepper to taste
2 limes, cut into wedges, for garnish
3-4 tablespoons snipped fresh chives, for garnish

Directions:
Place the spareribs into a large pot, and fill with just enough water to cover. Add the cup soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, granulated white sugar, garlic, cumin, onion powder, fresh oregano,thyme, bay leaves, lime juice, red wine vinegar,chicken bullion cube and salt and pepper,to taste. Bring to a rolling boil, then reduce heat and simmer uncovered over medium heat until the water has completely evaporated, about 45 minutes to an hour.

When all of the water has evaporated, remove the bay leaves, and allow meat to brown, turning occasionally using tongs. Use a spatula to scrape up browned bits and softened garlic from the bottom of the pot, and toss them with the pork. The garlic will dissolve into the meat.

Remove the meat, and drain on paper towels. Season with black pepper and garnish with lime wedges and chives.

Cook’s Notes:
Depending on the brand of soy sauce that you will use, you can completely eliminate the use of salt in this recipe if desired.

Dark soy sauce is one of the two types of soy sauce used most often in Chinese cooking. The light variety of soy sauce tends to be the other one used in Asian cuisine.

Dark soy sauce is aged for longer periods of time and usually contain molasses or caramel and a bit of cornstarch added, making it s thicker and darker in color than light soy sauce. Also note that dark soy sauce varieties tend to have a high sodium content, although not as high as light soy sauce. Because it tends to be a more full-bodied flavor, dark soy sauce is frequently added to marinades and sauces to add color and flavor to a dish.

Although dark soy sauce is used primarily in cooking, as it needs heating to bring out its full flavor, you will also sometimes find it in dipping sauce recipes.

To see how this recipe was originally made, see the video from shared.com in the video below:

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Ranch Fried Chicken

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Classic American ranch dressing herbs and seasonings appear in three components of the recipe—the buttermilk marinade, the flour coating, and the ranch dipping sauce—to pack summer flavors into this fried chicken. You can used  boneless thighs to ensure a juicy meat without the time consuming brining process with just taking 10 -15 minutes. Frying the thin thighs takes half the time that bone-in chicken parts require, which allows the fresh herb flavors toshine through. But I prefer brining bone-in, skin on chicken over night in the refrigerator.

MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH………

Talk about an unlikely origin story. The last thing that anyone expected Kenneth Henson of Thayer, Nebraska, to do during his three-year stint as a plumbing contractor in Alaska just after World War II was to develop a salad dressing recipe that would become one of America’s most popular condiments.

A plumbing contractor? In Alaska? You heard it right. Henson, 29 years old when he decamped for the then-U.S. territory, was a good cook, charged with preparing meals for his work-camp colleagues. A relentless kitchen tinkerer, he developed a buttermilk-based salad dressing that his crew loved.

In the early 1950s, Henson, who eventually changed his first name to Steve, relocated to the hills outside Santa Barbara, where he and his wife bought a 120-acre parcel and opened up a dude ranch, which they called “Hidden Valley.” Henson’s salad dressing was a fan favorite at meal time; eventually the Hensons began sending guests home with souvenir “ranch” seasoning packets.

Henson sold the “Hidden Valley Ranch” brand to Clorox for $8 million in 1972 and closed the ranch shortly thereafter. A shelfstable version of the dressing was created in 1983; today, ranch is the most popular salad dressing flavor in the United States.

Serves 4 to  6

Ingredients:
For the Chicken:
One  1-ounce packet Hidden Valley® Original Ranch® Salad Dressing & Seasoning Mix
3 cups whole buttermilk, divided
2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
2 teaspoons minced fresh dill
One 3-pound chicken cut into 8 pieces, rinsed, patted dry*

For the Coating:
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cornstarch
3 tablespoons minced fresh chives
3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon minced fresh dill
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
Vegetable oil, for frying

For the Ranch Sauce:
1/2 cup mayonnaise
Salt , to taste
Ground black pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon chopped chives, for garnish

Special Equipment:
Use a Dutch oven that holds 6 quarts or more for this recipe.
Thermometer

Directions:
In a large resealable plastic bag, combine dressing mix and 2 cups buttermilk. Seal bag, and shake until blended. Spoon 1⁄2 cup dressing into a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate.

Add chicken to bag; seal and refrigerate for 8 hours. Drain chicken, discarding marinade. Lightly pat chicken dry with paper towels  and season with pepper.

For the Buttermilk Marinade: Whisk all ingredients together in bowl. Set aside 1/4 cup buttermilk mixture for ranch sauce.

For the Coating: Whisk all ingredients together in large bowl.

Set wire rack in rimmed baking sheet. Set second wire rack in second rimmed baking sheet and line half of rack with triple layer of paper towels.

Working with 1 piece at a time, dip chicken in remaining buttermilk mixture to coat, letting excess drip back into bowl; then dredge in coating, pressing to adhere.Dip in buttermilk and dredge in flour mixture again, pressing gently to adhere coating. Transfer chicken to first wire rack without paper towels. At this point, flour coated chicken may be refrigerated, uncovered, for up to 2 hours.

Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it reaches 350°F. Working batches, add the chicken to the hot oil and fry until golden brown and a meat thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 165°F, about 12 minutes, turning occasionally.  Adjust burner, if necessary, to maintain oil temperature between 325 and 350 °F.

Transfer chicken to paper towel–lined side of second wire rack to drain on each side for 30 seconds, then move to unlined side of rack. Return oil to 350 °F and repeat with remaining chicken.

For the Ranch Sauce: Whisk mayonnaise into reserved buttermilk mixture. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Transfer chicken to platter. Garnish with chopped chives and serve with ranch sauce.

Cook’s Notes:
You can use 8 chicken thighs or 8 drumsticks or a combination of thigh and drumsticks in the place of a whole cut up chicken.

KEY INGREDIENTS: THREE HERBS, THREE WAYS: Fresh herbs were used to further enhance the ranch flavor—chives, cilantro, and dill—in were used in three ways for this chicken: in the buttermilk dip, in the flour coating, and in the serving sauce.

 

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Loaded Mashed Potato Croquettes

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Makes 18 to 20 Croquettes

Ingredients:
2 large egg yolks
2 cups cold mashed potatoes
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tablespoons fresh chives, chopped
2 Tablespoons fresh parsley , chopped
6 strips cooked bacon, coarsely chopped
1 Tablespoon all-purpose flour
4 large eggs
2 cups Japanese Panko breadcrumbs
Vegetable oil, for frying

Directions:
Mix egg yolks, mashed potatoes, Parmesan, chives, parsley , bacon and flour in a medium bowl. Roll into 2-inch logs. Cover  with plastic  wrap and chill in the refrigerator  until cold, at least 2 hours.

Beat eggs in a bowl; place breadcrumbs in another bowl. Pour vegetable oil into a medium skillet to measure ½  an inch(about 2 cups) and heat over medium-high until a pinch of breadcrumbs bubbles immediately when added.

Dip potato logs in egg, then roll in breadcrumbs. Working in batches, fry, turning often, until golden brown and crisp, 3–4 minutes. Drain on paper towels.

Serve immediately with your favorite condiments.

Hello Friends!

All photographs and content are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor

Pappardelle in Saffron Cream

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Photo Credit: Anna Williams

 

Serves 2

Ingredients:
Kosher salt, to taste
1 Tablespoon unsalted butter
1/2 small shallot, minced
Pinch of saffron threads
2/3 cup heavy cream
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 ounces dried pappardelle pasta
2 Tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for topping
2 Tablespoons roughly chopped fresh chives
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

Directions:
Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the shallot and saffron and cook, stirring occasionally, until the shallot is softened, about 2 minutes. Add the cream, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste; increase the heat to medium high and simmer until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and vanilla.

Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook as the label directs. Remove 1/4 cup cooking water, then drain the pasta and transfer to the skillet with the sauce. Add the reserved cooking water, the Parmesan and half of the chives and toss to coat. Serve topped with the lemon zest, remaining chives and more cheese.

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor

Scotch Quail Eggs

Proper Scotch eggs with lovely Scottish cheese and pickle
Photo Credit: Jamie Oliver, 2015

I am totally obsessed with the “Outlander” series of novels by Diana Gabaldon as much as I am about food and cooking. As with all of the books, the types of foods eaten by the fictional characters are often mentioned and in the 7th novel in the series, “An Echo In the Bone” mentions Scotch eggs in Chapter 74.

I have seen them before and they reminded me of a meatloaf with a boiled egg encased in ground meat. I never tried one, but after seeing them occasionally on cooking shows and eventually reading the Outlander books, my culinary curiosity went into overdrive…….

The London department store Fortnum & Mason claims to have invented Scotch eggs in 1738, but they may have been inspired by the Mughlai dish nargisi kofta or “Narcissus meatballs” once served from the Imperial Kitchens of Maharajas of India and were are composed  of minced or ground meat—usually beef, pork or lamb—mixed with spices and/or onion. For the most part, koftas are still a popular dish in Afghan, Arab,  Indian,Palestinian, Iranian, Jordanian, Kurdish, Moroccan, Pakistani, Romanian, Lebanese, and Turkish cuisines.

Given the origins of the Scotch egg, it would have most likely been influenced by Indian cuisine, since The British first arrived in India in the early 1600s and soon established trading posts in a number of cities under the control of The East India Company. By 1765 the Company’s influence had grown to such an extent that the British were effectively controlling most parts of the country.

The earliest printed recipe for Scotch eggs first  appeared in the 1809 edition of Mrs. Rundell’s A New System of Domestic Cookery. Mrs. Rundell—and later 19th-century authors—served them hot, with gravy.

In these modern times, Scotch eggs are a common picnic food. In the United Kingdom packaged Scotch eggs are commonly available in supermarkets, corner shops and motorway service stations. Miniature versions are also widely available, sold as “savoury eggs”, “picnic eggs”, “party eggs”, “snack eggs”, “egg bites” or similar. These contain chopped egg or a quail’s egg, rather than a whole chicken egg, and sometimes contain mayonnaise or chopped bacon.

In the United States, many “British-style” pubs and eateries serve Scotch eggs, usually served hot with dipping sauces such as ranch dressing, hot sauce, or hot mustard sauce. At the Minnesota State Fair Scotch eggs are served on a stick. Scotch eggs are available at most Renaissance Festivals from Maryland to Texas.

Not fully committed to using full sized chicken eggs, I opted to use quail eggs for this recipe. And I must say, the results were spectacular!

Makes About A Dozen Eggs

Ingredients:
12  quail eggs
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups panko breadcrumbs
1 large egg
1 pound good quality bulk pork sausage
½ teaspoon sweet paprika
Kosher salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
1 sprig fresh rosemary , leaves picked and very finely chopped
1 sprig fresh sage , leaves picked and very finely chopped
1 small bunch fresh chives , finely chopped
1 small bunch fresh parsley , leaves picked and finely chopped
1 whole nutmeg , for grating
Vegetable oil, for frying
English mustard

Directions:
Fill a pot two-thirds full of water and bring to a gentle boil. Gently add the quail eggs. Do not over crowd the pot and continue to boil for 4 to 5 minutes for hard boiled eggs. Remove the eggs from the boiling water with a slotted spoon and immediately plunge into ice cold water. Peel when cold.

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Put the sausage meat into another bowl with the herbs, paprika,a good grating of nutmeg, and a good pinch of salt and pepper.Gently mix until combined.Divide sausage into 12 equal portions.

Place flour in a wide shallow bowl and panko in another wide shallow bowl. Pat 1 portion of sausage into a thin patty over the length of your palm. Lay an egg on top of sausage and wrap sausage around egg, sealing to completely enclose. Repeat with remaining sausage and eggs.

Whisk your large egg in a medium bowl to blend. Working gently with 1 sausage-wrapped egg at a time, dip eggs into flour, shaking off excess, then coat in egg wash. Roll in panko to coat.

Place the coated eggs on a plate and store  in the refrigerator, uncovered for 1 to 2 hours.

Attach a deep-fry thermometer to side of a heavy pot. Pour in oil to a depth of 2 inches and heat over medium heat to 375°F. Fry eggs, turning occasionally and maintaining oil temperature of 350°F, until sausage is cooked through and breading is golden brown and crisp, 5 to 6 minutes.

Photo Credit: I AM A FOOD BLOG.COM, 2015

Use a slotted spoon to transfer eggs to a baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Serve warm with mustard.

Duck Livers on Toast with Whisky Cream Sauce

Duck livers on toast with whisky cream sauce

Duck livers have never had it so good. In this duck liver recipe, Gressingham duck livers are coated in an incredible whiskey cream sauce, then placed on pillowy brioche bread.Grade-A Duck Foie Gras Slices
Duck liver can also be purchased from, D’Artagnan one of the best places to buy duck liver (foie gras) online. D’Artagnan  introduced domestically-farmed foie gras to the United States in 1985 and has continually supplied fresh and prepared foie gras to the finest restaurants, stores and home cooks across the United States. If duck livers are not readily available, chicken livers can be used as a great substitute.

You can use whatever whisky you like for the sauce, depending on what sort of flavour you would  like the whisky to impart.  I used  a 12 year old Macallan Speyside Single Malt Macallan Scotch Whiskey, aged in sherry oak casks, for this recipe.

Macallan 12 Year Old / Sherry Oak

Deliciously smooth, with rich dried fruits and sherry, balanced with woodsmoke and spice. Described by F. Paul Pacult, the renowned international whiskey writer, in his book Kindred Spirits as ‘simply the best 12 Year Old single malt around’.

Being made since 1824, it is most sought-after whiskey for collectors, and you can find a huge range of Macallan Scotch whisky to buy online. Over the past four decades, Macallan has built probably the best reputation for quality malt whiskey and  rare vintages.

 

 

 

 

 

Serves 4

Ingredients:
For the Duck Livers:

1 1/2 pounds duck livers
Kosher salt, to taste
vegetable oil

 
For The Whisky Sauce:
4 Tablespoons unsalted butter
2 shallots, finely diced
3 Tablespoons whisky
1/2 cup brown chicken stock (click on the link for the recipe)
1/3 cup heavy cream
2 Tablespoons chopped parsley
2 Tablespoons chopped chives
1 dash of lemon juice

For the Brioche:
2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
1 loaf of brioche, sliced into 4 thick slices

 
Directions:
Begin by cleaning the livers and removing any small pieces of sinew or loose flesh.

Coat the base of a frying pan with oil and place over a high heat. Caramelize the livers until golden brown on both sides and season with salt – they should be slightly pink in the middle. Remove from the pan and rest in a warm place

Add the butter to the same pan with the shallots and sweat until soft. Add the whisky, reduce until almost dry, then add the chicken stock and reduce again by half.

To sweat is to cook something – usually vegetables – gently on a low-medium heat until tender but not caramelized, while stirring frequently.

Finish the whiskey sauce with heavy cream and reduce the sauce until it thickens slightly to the right consistency. Season with salt to taste and leave in a warm place.

To prepare the brioche, trim the crusts from the slices and each slice into neat circles. Heat a large knob of butter in a pan and fry the brioche until golden brown on each side. Remove from the pan and place on absorbent kitchen towel to drain.

Before serving, reheat the sauce and finish with the chives, parsley and a small dash of lemon juice. Place the warm livers on the toasted brioche and sauce generously.

Snow Crab Eggs Benedict

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This dish is  an  elegant twist on a classic and is perfect for a Sunday Brunch.

Ingredients:
3 pounds Cooked Snow Crab Meat
1 pound Butter

For the Eggs:
6 Eggs (room temperature)
1 teaspoon White Vinegar

For the Hollandaise:
1 cup Melted Butter (from crab poaching)
4 Egg Yolks (room temperature)
1 Lemon (juiced)
1/4 cup chopped chives
Salt, to taste
Freshly cracked black pepper, to taste

To Serve:
3 English Muffins (split and lightly toasted)
8 ounces Philadelphia Onion and Chive Cream Spread
6 slices Canadian Bacon
Arugula

Directions:
Heat butter in a saute pan over medium-low heat until melted and warm. Place crab meat in the butter to poach for 3 minutes.

For the Eggs: Bring a medium pot of water to a boil and add white vinegar. Reduce to a light simmer. Line a plate with paper towels. Crack one egg at a time into a bowl and slide into the water. Do not over crowd the pot. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes and remove to the prepared plate with a slotted spoon.

For the Hollandaise: In a bowl over a double boiler, whisk the egg yolks, and lemon juice for 4 to 5 minutes until it begins to thicken. Once the mixture is ribbony and can coat the back of a spoon, drizzle in the melted crab butter, whisking continuously. Stir in some chopped chives and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Once muffins are toasted drizzle with some of the melted crab butter. Spread onion and chive cream cheese on the bottom of the muffin. Place the muffin on a small plate and top with Canadian Bacon,arugula, a poached egg, and drizzle with hollandaise sauce. Serve immediately.

Pickled Beet Deviled Eggs

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Let these deviled eggs take center stage at your next party. They will have your guests wanting more!

Ingredients:
6 eggs

For the Brine:
One 16 oz  can beets with liquid
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt

For the Yolk Filling:
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 Tablespoon mayonnaise
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
1 Tablespoon white vinegar
3 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon light cream
Salt, to taste
White pepper, to taste
Fresh chopped chives,  for garnish

Directions:
Hard boil your eggs and remove the shells.For perfect hard boiled eggs, see  this link for the method: http://wp.me/p43Rn7-oY

Set the eggs aside.

To prepare  the brine, pour the entire can of  beets into a large mason jar or bowl. Add cider vinegar, sugar, peppercorns and salt. Stir mixture. Because beet juice will stain, carefully lower the hard boiled eggs into the brine, cover and let sit for at least 12 hours, up to two or three days. The longer the eggs stay submerged in the brine, the more sour and dark maroon they will become. If just the rim of magenta color of the egg white and a slightly pickled flavor is desired, let the eggs sit for about 13 to 16 hours.

When brining time has completed, using sharp knife dipped in hot water, cut each egg in half and carefully scoop out the yolks using a small teaspoon. Place yolks in a medium-sized bowl, along with the mustard, mayonnaise, curry, vinegar, and olive oil. Mix/mash until smooth. You can always add a little bit of light cream to the yolk filling, if it is too stiff. Add the salt and pepper to taste.

Using  small teaspoon, or a pastry bag or a plastic bag with the corner cut off,  spoon or pipe the yolk filling back into the magenta colored eggs. Sprinkle with chopped chives and arrange on a platter for serving.  If the eggs are not to be served immediately, cover the dish with plastic  wrap and place in the refrigerator until ready to be served.

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