Almond-Crusted French Toast with Raspberries

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Challah is the bread of choice here because it really absorbs the custard, creating an eggy, sweet version of French toast similar to the pain perdu of New Orleans. Crunchy almonds, fresh raspberries and fragrant orange zest bring this classic breakfast dish to a whole new level.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
6 eggs
1 cup half-and-half
2 Tablespoons sugar
Finely grated zest of 1 orange
3/4 teaspoon almond extract (optional)
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
8 thick slices challah or other egg bread, preferably day-old
Canola oil or clarified butter for cooking
1 cup sliced almonds
1 cup  fresh raspberries
Pure maple syrup, for serving

Directions:
Preheat an oven to 350°F.

In a large shallow bowl, whisk together the eggs, half-and-half, sugar, orange zest, almond extract and vanilla. Add the bread to the egg mixture and turn gently to coat evenly. Let stand until the bread has soaked up some of the egg mixture, about 1 minute.

Preheat a griddle over medium heat until hot; a few drops of water flicked onto the surface should skitter across it. Lightly oil the griddle. Spread the almonds on a plate. Remove the bread, 1 piece at a time, from the egg mixture, letting the excess liquid drip back into the bowl. Dip one side of the bread into the almonds, pressing gently to help the nuts adhere, and place on an ungreased baking sheet.

Place the bread slices, almond side down, on the griddle and cook until the nuts begin to brown, about 2 minutes. Flip the slices and cook until golden brown on the other side, about 2 minutes more. Transfer the slices, almond side down, to a lightly oiled baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake until the center of the bread is heated through but is still moist, about 10 minutes.

Serve the French toast hot, almond side up, topped with a handful of raspberries and drizzled with maple syrup.

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor


Cranachan

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Cranachan is a traditional Scottish dessert made  of oats, cream, whisky and raspberries. Many Scots still use the name “crowdie cream” because, in the past, a soft Scottish cheese called crowdie was used in the place of cream. A single malt Scotch make all the difference in this  delicious alternative to  a trifle.

 

Serves 2

 
 

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons of oatmeal
10 1/2 ounces fresh raspberries*
1 cup  heavy cream
2 Tablespoons good quality honey
2 Tablespoons single malt whisky*

 

Directions:

Place the oatmeal in a cool, dry pan and turn on the heat to simmer. Stirring occasionally, toast the oatmeal until it is golden brown. This process could take between 10 to 20 minutes. Once the oatmeal is toasted to a golden brown color, turn off the heat and let it cool in the pan.

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Place the cream in a bowl and whisk up until soft and relatively thick.  Add the honey and single malt whisky and fold it in with a whisk, until it is soft and creamy.

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Pick out some of the best raspberries for decoration and add three or four to the bottom of each serving glass,reserving a few for garnishing. Add the rest of the raspberries to the cream mixture and fold in carefully, breaking up a few of the raspberries to obtain a slight pink coloring to the cream.

Adding the Raspberries Mixing Together
Spoon the mixture into the serving glasses, then add cream to the top to make an even base for the oatmeal. Using a teaspoon, evenly sprinkle the oatmeal over the dessert. Add a raspberry for the finishing touch and chill for about three hours, or overnight in the refrigerator.
 

 
To serve the dessert, remove from the refrigerator and  top it off with a raspberry. Cranachan can be served on its own, or with cream and more raspberries.

The Final Touch

 

 

*Cook’s Notes:

The single malt scotch used in this recipe was Macallan 12 year old scotch. You can also use bourbon or rum in place of the scotch.

Strawberries can substituted for the raspberries.

 

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor