Miso Glazed Cod with Baby Bok Choy

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Cod is glazed in sweet miso before being broiled in the oven. The bok choy is flavored with orange zest and pepper flakes for a spicy, flavorful side.

Serves 2 

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons white miso paste
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon raw honey
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil, divided
1 1/4 pound  skinless cod fillets
6-7 baby bok choy, halved
2 teaspoons orange zest
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 teaspoon cornstarch
½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 teaspoon black sesame seeds, for garnish

Directions:
In a medium bowl, whisk miso,  soy sauce, vinegar, honey and ½ teaspoon sesame oil until smooth. Add fish to bowl and spoon marinade on top to coat both sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Heat oven to broil on high. Place a rack over a sheet pan and place fish on rack. Broil for 4 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F and bake for an additional 8 minutes, until fish flakes easily with a fork. Remove the cod from the oven and set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large nonstick skillet on medium-high, heat remaining ½ teaspoon of sesame oil. Add bok choy, cover and cook 3 to 4 minutes.

Whisk together orange zest and juice, cornstarch and pepper flakes. Add to skillet with bok choy and stir to coat; cook for 30 seconds, until sauce thickens.

To serve, transfer the bok choy and fish to the serving plates and garnish with a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

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Egg Foo Yung

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This lacy golden omelette with a filling of ground pork, shrimp, bean sprouts, and scallions was originally created as a special occasion dish.

The chefs at Shun Lee West in Manhattan have a great trick for forming egg foo yung: They use a wok ladle to place the egg mixture into the oil so that it sets in the shape of the ladle’s bowl to get that perfect dome shape.

Basically, scrounging around in my fridge, I actually has green bell pepper, bean sprouts, carrots and onions on hand, along with a bunch of eggs, so during this COVID-19 quarantine, the ingredients on hand made for an easy substitution.

Makes 8 Omelettes

INGREDIENTS:

For the Sauce:

1 cup chicken stock
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 tablespoon dry sherry
1 tablespoons cornstarch
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 1⁄2 inch pieces ginger, peeled and thinly sliced

For the Egg Foo Yung:
1⁄2 pound ground pork
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 1⁄2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon dry sherry
1 teaspoon plus 1 tbsp. sesame oil
Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon canola oil, plus more for frying
6 ounces raw shrimp, peeled, deveined, and finely chopped
1⁄2 cup water chestnuts, finely chopped, drained and squeezed dry
1⁄3 cup fresh bean sprouts
1⁄3 cup sliced scallions, plus more for serving
6 eggs, beaten

DIRECTIONS:

To make the sauce: Bring stock, 3 tablespoons soy sauce, the oyster sauce, 1 tablespoon sherry, 1 tablespoon cornstarch, the garlic, and ginger to a boil in a 1-quart saucepan over high heat. Cook, whisking, until thickened, 2-3 minutes; strain sauce and keep warm.

To make the Egg Foo Yung: Mix pork, 2 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon cornstarch, the vinegar, 1 teaspoon sherry, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl; set aside for 10 minutes. Heat 1 teaspoon canola oil in an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork mixture; cook, stirring and breaking up meat, until it is no longer pink, 3-4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer pork to a bowl; set aside.

Pour canola oil into a 6-quart saucepan to a depth of 2 inches. Heat until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350°F. Combine remaining soy sauce, cornstarch, and sesame oil, plus reserved pork, the shrimp, water chestnuts, bean sprouts, scallions, eggs, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Using a ladle and working in batches, gently lower 1⁄2-cup amounts of egg mixture into oil; cook, flipping once, until omelettes are puffed and brown, 1 1⁄2-2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer omelettes to paper towels.

Serve drizzled with reserved sauce; garnish with scallions.

COOK’S NOTES:

For a healthier version of this dish, omit the pork and the shrimp.

A variety of vegetables can be used in the recipe, which can include green bell pepper, julienned carrots, shredded cabbage and mushrooms,

Feel free to substitute a vegetable broth for the chicken broth, in making the sauce.

 

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Chicken Lo Mein

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Did you know that March has been designated as the National “Noodle Month”?

And if you are feeling like you are running out options for take out during the COVID-19 pandemic, and you are craving something salty, something savory, but you don’t know quiet these flavors are combined into your favorite take out dish, then this easy peasy recipe is just for you. It’s Chicken Lo Mein and it is packed with oodles of noodles and veggies to keep you happy and healthy at the same time.The noodles in this dish are big on flavor without the greasey guilt that you find in most take out foods. This recipe is pretty much straight forward. It is composed of just noodles, chicken and spinach cooked in a garlicky hoisin/soy sauce and dude, it is seriously fresh!

For the most part, lo mein noodles in the ethnic foods section of most major supermarkets. However, in this quarantine kitchen pantry, I substituted the lo mein noodles with the fettuccine I had on hand. You can also use spaghetti or soba noodles. I did not have any hoisin sauce, but there was a bottle of honey barbecue sauce in the fridge, which is somewhat similar to hoisin. I am happy to report that both of these substitution worked well in this dish and it turned out just as delicious.

So, are up to honing you home cooking skills with this dish? Are you game? Ready! Set! And away we go!

 

ENJOY!

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From the Quarantine Pantry:
Soy sauce, sesame oil, olive oil, honey bbq sauce, fettuccine, cilantro, garlic, carrots, arugula/spinac salad mix, snow peas and chicken breasts.

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS:

For the Sauce:

3 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

3 tablespoons hoisin sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

For the Lo Mein:

8 ounces uncooked lo mein noodles

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic

2 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into thin strips

1 cup shredded carrots

1 cup snow peas

3 cups fresh spinach

1/4 bunch of cilantro sprigs, optional

DIRECTIONS:

To make the sauce: In a small bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, hoisin sauce and sesame oil. Set the sauce aside.

For the lo mein: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the lo mein noodles and cook until al dente. Drain and set aside.

In a large nonstick sauté pan set over medium heat, add the olive oil and sesame oil. Once hot, add the garlic and chicken and cook, stirring constantly, until the chicken is cooked through, no longer pink. Transfer the chicken to a plate and set it aside.

Add the carrots and snow peas to the pan and cook, stirring constantly, until the vegetables are tender, about 3 minutes. Add the spinach, cooked noodles, chicken and prepared sauce to the pan and cook, stirring, until combined and the spinach is wilted, about 2 minutes.

To serve, place in shallow bowls and garnish with cilantro, if desired.

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All photographs and content, excepted where noted, are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

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