Tag Archives: Yukon Gold Potatoes

Vegetable Frittata

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Photo Credit: © 2017 GIANT LLC All Rights Reserved.

Frittatas just happened to be one of those dishes that you can use up a whole lot of random leftover vegetables and turn them into a savory meal for brunch or dinner. We like to serve this classic egg dish with fruit for breakfast or with Italian bread and a small mixed greens side salad for a light dinner.

Adapted from Giant LLC
Savory Magazine
September 2017

Serves 4

Ingredients:
2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided
One 8-10 ounce bag baby spinach leaves, washed and roughly chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic salt
2 cups baby Yukon gold potatoes
2 medium tomatoes, diced
8 large eggs
½ cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the spinach to the skillet and cover; allow to cook 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic salt and cover again for another 5 minutes; remove from heat and allow to cool. Place the spinach in a clean kitchen towel. Roll the towel up and squeeze the moisture from the spinach. Remove the spinach from the towel and place in a bowl and set aside.

Cut the potatoes into quarters. Heat the remaining olive oil in a 10-inch nonstick or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes. Cook for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes start to brown.

Meanwhile, beat the eggs with 2 tablespoons of water and a pinch of salt. Arrange the spinach over the potatoes. Scatter the tomatoes over the spinach, then pour the eggs over the vegetables. Sprinkle with the cheese. Cook until the edges are set, about 3 minutes.

Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake for 12 minutes, or until the eggs are completely set in the center.

To serve, slide the frittata out of the skillet and onto a cutting board. Using a serrated knife, slice it into wedges and serve warm with a fresh fruit for brunch or with a small side salad of mixed greens for a light lunch or dinner.

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Dali Chicken

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This classic dish  appears on P. F. Chang’s  restaurant menu as tender slices of chicken breast wok-tossed with dried red chilies, potatoes and scallions in a signature spicy sauce. And we discovered the secret ingredient was cumin. Who knew?!!!

We are still perfecting the recipe in our test lab, so please stay tuned, the recipe will follow shortly.

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Thank you so much!

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Pommes de Terre Sarladaise (Sarlat Potatoes)

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Duck fat, which is something of a well-kept (and wildly delicious) secret to French chefs. This dish originated in the city of Sarlat in the Dordogne region in southern France, an area where duck and goose farming is so common, and the fat from those birds so ubiquitous in cookery, this preparation of potatoes comes as naturally as breathing. The original dish featured porcini mushrooms (cèpes). In this version of the recipe, the duck fat is used to enhance the earthy flavor of skillet-fried potatoes and gives them a gorgeous silkiness and golden-crisp edges. Showered with garlic and parsley, this is the type of rustic French potato side dish that everyone loves alone or as an ideal accompaniment for duck confit, roast chickens, dense and flavorful stews.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons  duck fat*
4 large Yukon Gold potatoes,
8 medium cloves garlic, sliced thin
1 cup water
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon chopped flat leaf parsley
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
Cut potatoes into 1/2-inch slices. Add 3/4 cup water and salt to potatoes to a medium saucepan  and bring to boil. Cover and cook until potatoes are tender.

Transfer the potatoes to a large colander and shake vigorously to remove excess water. Using paper towels, pat the potatoes dry.

Add fat to cast iron skillet and heat over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook stirring occasionally, until potatoes are deep golden brown.

Add parsley, season to taste with additional salt and black pepper, stir gently to combine, and serve immediately.

*Cook’s Notes:
The fat used in this dish is usually duck or goose fat, and they both can be  hard to find in most local grocery stores . Clarified butter, or ghee  that can be found in markets Indian is a great substitute .

All photographs and content are copyright protected. Please do not use these photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this photograph and all other contents, then we kindly ask that you link back to this site. We are eternally grateful and we appreciate your support of this blog.

Thank you so much!

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Spanish Omelette With Potatoes and Chorizo

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Crispy potato and chorizo is a classic Spanish combination, so why not  whisk up your eggs with this quintessential  Spanish sausage  and potato to make a decadent omelette  with a salad on the side that can be served for breakfast lunch or dinner.

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 ounces Spanish chorizo , sliced into thin half-moons
3/4 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, diced
1/4 teaspoon whit vinegar
Kosher salt, to taste
Ground black pepper, to taste
10 large eggs
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
1/2 Tablespoon unsalted butter
1 cup shredded Manchego or sharp Cheddar Cheese
One 8-ounce package baby arugula
1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced

 

Directions:

Heat oven to 400° F.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the yellow onion and cook for 5 minutes. Spoon pan contents out and set onion aside. Wipe the skillet using a clean kitchen towel.

In medium saucepan, add water, potatoes and a touch of salt and vinegar and over high heat, bring to a boil. This technique will ensure that the potatoes will maintain their shape without running the risk of breaking down or collapsing when added to the chorizo. Cook the potatoes until fork tender.

Once the potatoes are par-cooked, drain them and heat  1 teaspoon of olive oil a separate cast iron skillet over medium heat. Fry the potatoes, tossing them and stirring them slowly so that they get a chance to build up a nice, even, crisp golden brown crust. Set aside.

In the cleaned out skillet used to cook the onions,  add the chorizo and a pinch of salt. Cook for  3 to 5 minutes as the chorizo will start to sizzle, releasing all its tasty oils and spices. (Note: Mexican chorizo is featured in the pictures below.)

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Photo Credit: The Food Lab

 

Once the chorizo is crisp, return the onions to the skillet and add the potatoes.

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Photo Credit: The Food Lab

 

Place the eggs, heavy cream, salt and pepper in the blender and mix until very frothy, about 1 minute.

Heat another  large ovenproof skillet  over medium heat and, when hot, add the butter to the pan, swirling to coat. Pour the beaten eggs into the skillet immediately, adding the potatoes, chorizo and cheese, spreading everything out evenly.

Using the rubber spatula, stir continuously and scrape down sides so as to evenly cook the mixture. Once the mixture resembles wet scrambled eggs, after about 30 seconds, use the rubber spatula to smooth the eggs so that they are an even depth throughout.

Place the whole skillet in the preheated oven until the omelette is golden brown on top and just cooked through in the middle.

Cook until almost set, about 10 seconds longer, and use the rubber spatula to fold the omelet in half. Carefully slide the omelette out of the pan onto the plate.

Divide the arugula and red onion among plates and drizzle with the remaining olive oil. Cut the omelette into wedges and serve with the salad.DSC01964

Cook’s Notes:

Chorizo (Spanish) or chouriço (Portuguese) is a term originating in the Iberian Peninsula u-shaped-chorizo.jpgencompassing several types of pork sausages. Traditionally, chorizo is encased in natural casings made from intestines, a method used since Roman times.

Chorizo is a Spanish pork sausage in which case it must be cooked before eating. In Europe, it is more frequently a fermented, cured, smoked sausage, in which case it is oftenhorizo.jpg sliced and eaten without cooking, and can be added as an ingredient to add flavor to other dishes. Spanish chorizo and Portuguese chouriço get their distinctive smokiness and deep red color from dried smoked red peppers (pimentón/pimentão).

 

Due to culinary tradition and the high cost of imported Spanish smoked paprika, Mexican chorizo is usually made with native chili peppers of the same Capsicum annuum species, used abundantly in Mexican cuisine. Mexican chorizo is also highly seasoned with warm spices like cinnamon, cloves, and coriander, bright red from a combination of paprika andachiote, and tangy from vinegar and it does not need to be aged or cured. In Latin America, vinegar also tends to be used instead of the white wine usually used in Spain.

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Where Spanish chorizo is a firm, raw, dry-cured sausage flavored with smoked paprika and South American chorizos tend to be coarse ground garlicky sausages cooked in their natural casings, Mexican chorizo is that loosely bound, finely ground, by-the-pound, best when browned stuff that you’ll find in the fresh sausages department. It comes stuffed either into natural casings, or, more often than not, into plastic sleeves that need to be sliced and squeezed out before cooking.

 

TODAY.com Parenting Team FC Contributor

Petite Pommes Anna

Adapted from Molly Stevens
From BON APPÉTIT,  November 2012
Mini Herbed Pommes Anna recipe

This side dish is a very simple deconstruction of that classic  French casserole potato dish, Pommes Anna, consisting of  of thinly sliced potatoes that are layered and cooked in a generous amount of melted butter. This version is  presented as a single-serve dish with the classic French  attitude.The more carefully you arrange the potato slices, the prettier the results and the better the individual-size cakes will hold together.

They are perfect side dish to go along with baked chicken or even a slab of braised short ribs and they will be sure to impress your guests at the dinner table.

Enjoy!

  
Serves   12
Ingredients:
1 stick unsalted butter
12-24 small tender fresh  thyme sprigs plus 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped leaves
1 garlic clove, minced
1 3/4 pounds small Yukon Gold potatoes, each slightly larger than a golf ball
2 teaspoons kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Special equipment:
A standard 12-cup muffin pan
A mandoline
Parchment paper

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Brush muffin cups all over with butter. Line bottoms with parchment-paper rounds. Arrange 1-2 small thyme sprigs in center of each round. Drizzle 1/2 teaspoon butter into bottom of each cup.Add chopped thyme and garlic to remaining butter in saucepan. Stir over medium-low heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.Using mandoline, slice potatoes crosswise into very thin rounds (less than 1/16″ thick), placing them in a large bowl as you work. Pour herb butter over and season with salt and pepper; toss to coat well.Divide potato slices among muffin cups, layering overlapping slices to create a circular pattern. Lightly press center of each to make compact. Drizzle any remaining butter and seasoning from bowl over.

Cover muffin pan tightly with foil and place on a baking sheet. Bake until potatoes can be pierced easily with the tip of a knife, about 35 minutes. Remove foil; invert a rimmed baking sheet over pan. Turn, lightly tapping on counter, releasing potatoes onto sheet. Rearrange any slices that may have fallen out. Using a metal spatula, carefully turn cakes, thyme sprigs facing down. Discard parchment. DO AHEAD: Potatoes can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill.

Increase heat to 425°F. Uncover cakes if needed. Bake until bottoms and edges are golden and crispy, 25 to 30 minutes. Carefully turn cakes, thyme sprigs facing up. Serve immediately