Pommes de Terre Sarladaise (Sarlat Potatoes)

DSC07334 (2) pommes -otm@tk.jpg

Duck fat, which is something of a well-kept (and wildly delicious) secret to French chefs. This dish originated in the city of Sarlat in the Dordogne region in southern France, an area where duck and goose farming is so common, and the fat from those birds so ubiquitous in cookery, this preparation of potatoes comes as naturally as breathing. The original dish featured porcini mushrooms (cèpes). In this version of the recipe, the duck fat is used to enhance the earthy flavor of skillet-fried potatoes and gives them a gorgeous silkiness and golden-crisp edges. Showered with garlic and parsley, this is the type of rustic French potato side dish that everyone loves alone or as an ideal accompaniment for duck confit, roast chickens, dense and flavorful stews.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons  duck fat*
4 large Yukon Gold potatoes,
8 medium cloves garlic, sliced thin
1 cup water
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon chopped flat leaf parsley
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
Cut potatoes into 1/2-inch slices. Add 3/4 cup water and salt to potatoes to a medium saucepan  and bring to boil. Cover and cook until potatoes are tender.

Transfer the potatoes to a large colander and shake vigorously to remove excess water. Using paper towels, pat the potatoes dry.

Add fat to cast iron skillet and heat over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook stirring occasionally, until potatoes are deep golden brown.

Add parsley, season to taste with additional salt and black pepper, stir gently to combine, and serve immediately.

*Cook’s Notes:
The fat used in this dish is usually duck or goose fat, and they both can be  hard to find in most local grocery stores . Clarified butter, or ghee  that can be found in markets Indian is a great substitute .

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